ONE DC Monthly Voice - November 2016

"The Fourth Way will harness the power and strategic location of indigenous people, exploiting pressure points beyond the workplace to oppose and transform unjust, unequal, and undemocratic systems." -Julian Brave Noisecat


Mapping Our Radical Atlas: Introducing the 2015 People's Progress Report

Washington, DC is one of the most rapidly gentrifying cities in the country. But this is only the latest flare of violent, economically driven displacement in the area. The Piscataway, the Anacostank (who resided in the area now known as Anacostia), the Pamunkey, the Mattapanient, the Nangemeick, and the Tauxehent were all brutally forced from the region. And more: the names are not complete, the stories are not complete, and the maps are not complete.

So it feels all the more apt to transform the People’s Progress Report into a gesture of counter-mapping—to fill in maps and to fill in the gaps. Counter-mapping, also known as counter-hegemonic cartography, radical cartography, and mapping-back, originated as an indigenous resistance practice to contest colonialist claims to land. It’s about story and sovereignty. It’s about spatial justice. No map is neutral. And this radical atlas, far from exhaustive, does not claim to be. We’re unapologetic about mapping toward a more equitable District and mapping back against the “official” maps that erase and displace longtime Black residents of DC and all people who are “mapped out” of DC’s local history.

In 2015 we went on learning journeys, self-study tours, and trainings to build our knowledge and to chart out new plans and strategies for subversive cartography­—mapping back to reinvigorate ourselves and mapping forward to reclaim our city. In order to reclaim DC, we must acknowledge that we are losing Black homelands and Black landscapes. The whitewashing of DC is real and it is formidable. That’s why our organizing work—through the People’s Platform, Black Workers Center, and Right to Housing—is key to building a powerful base of longtime DC residents, to naming the terrain of renewed power and resistance.

And yes, we are hopeful. ONE DC supporters are showing up in our organizing geography: Justice First, API Resistance, Black Lives Matter DC, BYP100, DC Showing Up for Racial Justice, and the Neighborhood Solidarity Network. So let’s “map in” our struggle for freedom! As freedom fighter and former political prisoner Angela Y. Davis wrote in her book, Freedom Is A Constant Struggle, “Our histories never unfold in isolation. We have to talk about systemic change. We can’t be content with individual actions.” Everyday we organize we add a page to the DC radical atlas. Join this movement of cartographers of organized resistance!

Click here to download & study the 2015 People's Progress Report: "Radical Atlas"

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We Dance About Life

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Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie, Esmeralda Huerta

Click here to view more photos from our latest fundraising event -- a special ONE DC showing of Dance Place's What's Going On? Life, Love, & Social Justice. Thanks to your support, we are closer to our goal of raising $1.3 million over 2 years to support the opening of the Black Workers Center and #Another10Years of resident-led organizing for racial & economic equity in DC! Click here to donate.

Thank you again to our sponsors and to all those who bought tickets, donated, & volunteered!


We Appreciate You.

Member Appreciation is our end-of-year event to celebrate the wins, actions, and accomplishments of our members, donors, supporters, volunteers, but you don't have to be a member to attend! This is the perfect event to learn more about ONE DC and how you can get involved, while enjoying good food, music, & company. All ages are welcome.
Click here to RSVP

Delicious food served by Organic Soul Live! (Contact Elijah Joy at theelijahjoy@gmail.com for more info)

Featuring a performance by Baltimore-based Revolutionary Hip Hop Artist Son of Nun
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Transportation Info:
Metro- Green Line to Congress Heights Metro Station
Bus- A2, A6, A7, A8, A4, W2, W3 (Stop: MLK Ave. SE)
Parking available onsite. Click here for driving directions.

Volunteer roles needed:

  • Arrive at 2:15 PM to help set up
  • Childcare
  • Work with caterer to monitor & stock food/beverages
  • Stay until 7:00 PM to help clean & pack up

We need help offsetting the costs of space, food, supplies & honorariums for our favorite end-of-the-year event celebrating our members, donors, volunteers, & supporters.

Click here to sponsor Member Appreciation

Click here to start your monthly sustaining donation of $10, $20, or $50 a month

Click here to pay your annual membership dues.
If you have questions about the status of your dues, email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.


Housing is a Human Right

By Mary Walrath, StreetSense

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Is housing a universal human right? This is the question that community members gathered to discuss in a town-hall style meeting at the Church of the Epiphany on October 28. The Focus Attitude and Commitment to Excellence (FACE) group of Street Sense vendors, along with the People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC), convened to form a panel and deliberate, with an audience of housed and unhoused individuals, on issues of housing, poverty and homelessness.

Robert Warren, the executive director of the People for Fairness Coalition, Sheila White, member of FACE and PFFC, Dominic Moulden of ONE DC, William Merrifield of Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, Schyla Pondexter-Moore from Empower DC and Jane Zara, a public interest lawyer, came together on a panel moderated by Patty Mullahy Fugere of the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless.

Click here to read the full article on StreetSense

Click here to view photos from the event


Nathan Cummings Foundation Fellowship

The Nathan Cummings Foundation Fellowship supports visionary leaders by giving them boundless space to turn an inspired idea in the field of social justice into a world-changing reality. The Fellowship awards three individuals up to $150,000 each to pursue an innovative project that seeks to address a challenge related to climate change or inequality – or within the intersection of these two major issues. An NCF Fellowship must align with at least one of the Foundation’s core focus areas: Inclusive Clean Economy; Racial and Economic Justice; Corporate and Political Accountability; and Voice, Creativity and Culture. The Nathan Cummings Foundation is currently accepting applications for the 2017 Fellowship until December 12.

Click here for more info and to apply

 


Upcoming Events

DC Labor Chorus presents An Evening of Favorite and Sacred Songs
Saturday, December 3rd - 7:30 PM
ATU Tommy Douglas Conference Center - 10000 New Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring MD
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Fund the Resistance! End of Year Party for Many Languages, One Voice
Saturday, December 3rd - 6:30 PM - 10:30 PM
Boss Bistro & Lounge - 2463 18th St NW
Join MLOV for a review of our year's work and organizing highlights, hear from our powerful immigrant members, recommit yourselves to being warriors, bask in each other's fierce presence, and of course...enjoy great music and food!
Click here to RSVP & for more info

Monthly Black Workers Center Meeting

Thursday, December 15 - 6:00 PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
ONE DC's Black Workers Center (BWC), is a member-led space that builds racial and economic justice through popular education, direct action and worker-owned alternatives.
Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News

Thank you to Black Benefactors for hosting a house party fundraiser & community dialogue in honor of ONE DC's 10th Anniversary! We appreciate your support and the opportunity to engage in conversation & reflection on organizing for racial & economic justice in DC.

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To host your own house party fundraiser for ONE DC, contact Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.


Shopping Online in December?

Register with ONE DC at smile.amazon.com/ch/87-0766022 and Amazon donates to ONE DC every time you shop.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - October 2016

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"Movements should operate under the assumption of equality of sacrifice. Working in solidarity means doing something that's uncomfortable.” -Eugene Puryear, founder of Justice First


The State of Black Labour Organizing in DC: Past, Present and Future

On Tuesday, October 25, ONE DC, along with Resource Generation, hosted an interactive panel discussion about the history and current state of black labour in DC as well as the role of intersectionality in solidarity organizing. Sitting on the panel were Iimay Ho, the Associate Director at Resource Generation and serving on the board of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice; Kimberly Mitchell, a long time union member and labor activist in the fashion, beauty, and retail industry as well as Vice President of the UFCW Board of Directors; and Eugene Puryear, founder of the anti-gentrification group Justice FirstJobs Not Jails Coalition, Stop Police Terror Project-D.C. and author of the book Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America.

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 From Left: Kimberly Mitchell, Iimay Ho, Eugene Puryear


During the discussion, the panel named two forces impeding a robust and inclusionary coalition of black labour organization: 1) A shift away from labour organizing towards non-profit paternalism and 2) an absence of worker solidarity.

Many of the organizations built to work on behalf of black workers and communities are run by non-representational groups. It's the "professionalization of organizing," Eugene remarked. Non-profits embody an institutional hierarchy whereby the needs of the community are defined by an organization and not the people. "Black workers have become the object of organizing, not the subject," Eugene quickly added. Career activism has a tendency to silence the voice of the community in favor of its own programs and political allegiances, especially when confronted with the need for funding.

This tendency speaks to the reality of organizing within conditions set by Neoliberal Capitalism. Organizations need money to function and that money must come from somewhere. Yet, Resource Generation has worked tirelessly to reduce the limitations funding an organization normally necessitates. "We have the flexibility to give to organizations, which frees you to support this or that," Iimay deftly explained, "There's no hoop jumping." rg_event2.JPGOne of Resource Generation's core values is believing that "social justice movements need to be led by communities most directly impacted by injustice." Resource Generation aims to reverse the status quo of funding: They subordinate their privilege and wealth to the voice of the community.

Still, even if an answer to the question of funding were found we must still confront the stark lack of worker solidarity and organization. Lamenting, Kimberly spoke a hard truth, "Mothers and daughters have always been organizing the community, church, schools, etc but they've become complacent. I have to remind them that they are needed." A little later she discusses the disparity between the older and newer generation of workers: "I see workers that have worked for forty plus years being disrespected and told 'We don't need you.' What we have now is an assembly line of workers who are unorganized and untrained who are lucky to be there past the ninety day probation period. Its very important we teach the younger generation to let them know that this is not okay or normal." Similarly, Iimay vigilantly highlighted the need for an intersectional approach to organizing: "The legal/illegal immigration status is a strategy for keeping a mass of workers that are vulnerable. Trans folk have some of the highest homeless and unemployed numbers, which are even more when you're black and trans. Queer youth can be cut off from their family and resources."

In the end, the panel left the audience with some advice for moving forward. "Accountability is a key issue. The city will pass anything that sounds progressive but will include either infinite loopholes or make it impossible to enforce." Kimberly was in agreement: "DC is dressed up with nowhere to go." Kimberly also was adamant about opposing gentrification: "What we need to organize around is housing. We are being displaced. This is everybody's fight." Earlier in the discussion, Iimay stood by countering the effects of gentrification: "I don't believe DC should be built on my needs and my consumption." By the end of the night she returned to this sentiment: "The powers that be center the needs of wealthy people and not long-term residents. We need to change the game. We need to focus systemically."

If you would like to find out more about Resource Generation click here. Click here to support ONE DC.


Please join us in Standing with #NoDAPL

In a display of absolute barbarism, militarized police, in conjunction with the National Guard, brutally repressed the peaceful water protectors at Standing Rock in North Dakota. The fascists subjected the Sioux Nation, along with fellow demonstrators, to beatings, tear gas, sound cannons, and dog attacks. There are also reports of inhumane treatment where protesters were thrown into dog kennels after being arrested.

The Sioux Nation are protesting the North Dakota Access Pipeline on grounds of both treaty and human rights violations. First, the pipeline would cut straight through Sioux territory violating the treaty of Fort Laramie drawn in 1868. Second, the pipeline would devastate the local environment and wildlife including our most precious resource: water.

These events must be taken in the context of America's long history of brutalizing and betraying indigenous peoples. This tradition traces all the way back to America's seventh President Andrew Jackson and beyond. The United States has endlessly violated treaties with indigenous peoples often redrawing them under the threat of violence.

From gentrification in the District to violating the land rights of the Sioux Nation we see the same pattern repeat. Power knows but two modes of response: indifference to the cries for justice and violence for those who resist.

We ask you to stand with the Sioux Nation and with all peoples displaced and dispossessed in the name of profit and Empire!

Begin by learning more and visiting the Sacred Stone Camp website.
Sign a petition calling for an end to the construction of the North Dakota Access Pipeline.
Stay updated by following NoDAPL on twitter.


 

ONE DC Member Spotlight: Luci Murphy

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Over the weekend we sat down with Luci Murphy as a part of our Member Spotlight feature. We met at Lamont Park in Mt. Pleasant, which was soon to be the site of the annual Dia De Los Muertos or Day of the Dead celebration with Luci slated to perform later that day. Together we discussed her thoughts on ONE DC, politics, and the unique importance of music.

ONE DC: Before we get started, I see everyone is setting up for an event. What is it? Are you performing today?
Luci: Mmhmm! Its the Day of the Dead. The tradition is that people build an altar and bring photographs of their deceased loved ones, put them on the alter, and remember them. It's a day of remembrance. We'll have music and poetry. We usually do a little parade a few blocks through the neighborhood to remind everybody.

ONE DC: You have a rich history with ONE DC stretching back 10 years. Could you briefly state what attracted you to the organization in the beginning and what motivates you to still be an active member?
Luci: The issues. The issues of housing and jobs. These are issues that we still have not resolved. There's a lot of dislocation. I remember when my aunt lived in a substantial house in the 60s and the price on it was 25,000. The same house is probably three quarters of a million now. How to you do that? People's salaries aren't changing. What is this?

ONE DC: What is it about ONE DC's approach to organizing that you like?
Luci: The emphasis on co-ops. Studying co-ops and preparing people to build co-ops! 

ONE DC: Last month you performed at the Renter's Day of Action. What inspired your performance? What did you want people to take away?
Luci: We have a lot of vacant buildings in Washington, DC and then we have our homeless. Why can't we get these two together?

ONE DC: The Black Worker's Center Chorus is in its early stages of gestation. Whats the difference between it and the DC Labour Chorus?
Luci: The Black Worker's Center Chorus will mostly be from Washington, DC. It's going to be the people who are dealing with these issues first hand. I would really like to see a good representation of wards six, seven, & eight, which is where the BWC is located.

ONE DC: When do you think it'll begin meeting?
Luci: It'll be after December 3rd.

ONE DC: And if someone is interested in joining?
Luci: Call me! People are scared to call me! They know I'm going to give them something to do!

ONE DC: As a performer, music and art are an essential dynamic in your activism. Who's work, either artistic or political, inspires you?
Luci: I grew up with some very activist congregations. St. Steven and the Incarnations and because I was a member of St. Steven I met a woman, an older lady from Mississippi who embodied the tradition. She played three chords on the guitar but she played them in a hell of a way! She got people to sing along with her. She had something called Mother Scott and her children and I was one of her children. The pastor would take us to city council hearings and she would sing to make a point and of course that would make the news. Not everyone comes to a city council hearing with a guitar prepared to sing!

ONE DC: There's something special about music, especially call-and-response, that can bring people together. What do you find unique about it?
Luci: It works! 

ONE DC: Music and Art have always played a fundamental role in the struggle for justice, emancipation, and equality. Outside of the feeling of solidarity when performing music, how else do you see music contributing to the struggle for justice?
Luci: We didn't have the SNCC freedom singers here but we had their recordings. We were able to use them.

ONE DC: American University was hosting a panel and an art gallery to honor the work of Emory Douglas. They were discussing the power and importance of his work and the way he could communicate very complicated messages in a very simple way thereby reaching a wide variety of people. Do you feel that music shares this quality?
Luci: Absolutely! I think music is actually more social because more people can participate. The creation of visual art is a very solitary process whereas music is a social process.

ONE DC: You mentioned there's more participation in music not only in a call-and-response but people are also free to riff on music anyway they want to at any time they want to through rhythm, clapping, vocalization, improvisation, etc.
Luci: Fredrick Douglas KirkPatrick said that it used to be that anybody could sing a song or pray a prayer but now its gotten so complicated. We only have specialists doing these things and we're lost in this specialization.

ONE DC: This kinda goes back to politics where the only people to be respected are the specialists.
Luci: Our Chorus is singing a song called 'You can dance, you can sing' taken from a proverb from Zimbabwe, which has been translated as 'If you can walk, you can dance; if you can talk, you can sing' but thats really a message for us in the United States. What the actual song says is if you can dance, dance, if you can sing, sing! You know, like do it! Everyone in Zimbabwe can dance and sing and nobody's embarrassed. That is part of what you do as a member of a community whereas here if you don't move just right you may get criticized and if you're self-conscious you may decide not to participate. 

ONE DC: Similarly, there are now specific places to do it. The community aspect is being pushed out. The only way to access it is by joining a club that you have to pay for or renting a space to play in.
Luci: And I see some of the singing and music playing has become commercialized: "If you pay such and such an amount you can play as a part of this jazz group we are starting."

ONE DC: You should be able to just pick up and play. That's just what you do.
Luci: But somebody has just rented some space and has decided that they're going to get some people to pay for their time. That shouldn't be the only way that culture survives.

ONE DC: All across the country people are facing dispossession and displacement at the hands of the ruling class for profit. From the District to North Dakota neoliberal capitalism is violating people's right to housing and land. Even more, resistance is often met with brutal state violence and repression. How do you think people should go about building solidarity with one another, especially when you are economically contributing to those forces, willingly or unwillingly?
Luci: We need to study history because in order to know who we are we need to know where we come from. This country is built on great injustice and cruelty for which it's never apologized. It's never apologized to the indigenous people for all the murder and theft and never apologized to the African people for all the centuries of unpaid labor. We need to study who we are, where we come from, and then form that we will know what we have to do, but it starts with an apology. 

ONE DC: How do you get an apology without allowing Empire to bury these issues as something that's happened only 'in the past'?
Luci: We have to build consciousness and right now folks are very unconscious. They are having poisonous television, poisonous food, poisonous water, and poisonous air thrown at them all the time. Well, how can they get conscious? We've got to build a movement. A movement that has to educate, energize, and encourage folks.

To contact Luci about the Black Workers Center Chorus you can find her Facebook page here or call her at 202.234.8840.

Sponsor ONE DC's Presentation of Dance Place's What's Going On: Life, Love, & Social Justice

For one night only on Friday, November 18th, ONE DC will be hosting Dance Place’s very special Marvin Gaye-inspired performance: “What’s Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice.” In Dance Place’s first full-length production, taking inspiration from 1971’s inimitable What’s Going On, Marvin Gaye’s insights into life, love and social justice are given fresh perspectives with new choreography by Vincent E. Thomas, Ralph Glenmore and Sylvia Soumah. The evening-length work features Modern, Jazz and West African dance and seeks to spark conversations to ignite change in each community it touches.

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Dance Place has generously dedicated the performance of “What’s Going On” on November 18th to be a night of fundraising for ONE DC. The evening will begin with a reception at 6pm, followed by the performance, lasting until 9pm.

By sponsoring this event, you will contribute to our efforts to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund #Another10Years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC. Securing sponsors will also enable us to offer more free/reduced price tickets to this event for our long-time members. Click here to become a What's Going On? sponsor!

To make your sponsorship donation offline, please mail check to ONE DC, PO Box 26049, Washington, DC, 20001, or contact Dominic at 202-232-2915, dmoulden@onedconline.org.

You can also buy your ticket to the event here. Free or reduced price tickets are available!

We are looking for volunteers to both prepare for and help run the event!
Volunteer roles include:

  • 6 Ushers - 4 volunteers to usher people in and out of the theater. 2 volunteers to assist stage manager Hannah with various tasks
  • 4 volunteers to arrive at 5:00pm to both set up food and clean up afterwards
  • 2 volunteers to monitor the food once it's been set up
  • 4 volunteers to help clean up after the event
  • 2 volunteers to help serve beverages
Similarly, ONE DC is also looking for volunteers to phone bank the weeks of 10/31 and 11/7. Phone banking will include spreading the word about the event as well as recruiting sponsors. If you're interested in volunteering for the event please email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org, or call 202.232.2915.

ONE DC Welcomes New Staff!

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Pictured right: Yasmina Mrabet

Yasmina Mrabet is a Moroccan-American organizer and conflict resolution practitioner. She grew up in the Middle East, North Africa, and the United States in a cross-cultural, interfaith household. Yasmina is Community Organizer for ONE DC's People's Platform, and has been a member of ONE DC for three years. She joins ONE DC with experience as an organizer in the Labor Movement, the Anti-War Movement, and the Movement for Black Lives. Most recently, as a union organizer with UFCW Local 400, Yasmina worked to develop Project Retail, a growing group of retail and food workers fighting for living wages, fair working conditions, and access to public transportation in and around Washington, D.C. She remains a member of Stop Police Terror Project DC's core organizing group, and is President of the Board of Directors of NVMS, a conflict resolution organization based in Fairfax, VA. Yasmina is passionate about organizing to expose, oppose, and resist institutionalized racism and the systematic targeting of black and brown communities through gentrification, mass incarceration, and war. Yasmina holds a BA from the University of Virginia in Middle Eastern Studies and a MS from George Mason University in Conflict Analysis and Resolution.


Organizing & Coalition Building Updates

Congress Heights
On October 27, DC attorney General Karl Racine filed a lawsuit against Sanford Capital LLC, citing 129 code violations. This is the second lawsuit this year filed by the District against Sanford Capital (The first was on behalf of the Congress Heights residents while this lawsuit is on behalf of the residents of Terrace Manor Apartments). Click here and here to read more.

Brookland Manor

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Click here to sign and show your support for Brookland Manor residents.

Black Workers Center
Members from the Black Workers Center met on October 20 at our regular monthly meeting to continue discussing the Five Faces of Oppression. In our discussion of Marginalization, the act of relegating or confining a group of people to a lower social standing or outer limit or edge of society, questions were raised concerning the disparity between gentrification in the District and the struggle for economic and racial equality. More specifically, how to organize in the face of the displacing and deteriorating effects of gentrification. Along these lines, members also discussed the Black Workers Center's definition of Blackness. By the end, the definition was left open and subject to develop as we continue to push our conversations each month.

Back in September, members of the Black Workers Center and Cooperation DC sat down with the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. DMPED is beginning to develop a new economic strategy and is interested in cooperative development as part of a broader economic strategy for DC. To get involved with Cooperation DC, click here. Similarly, DMPED is hosting a panel discussion on the effects of sharing and gig economies on the District. Click here for more information.

Click here to read the feature of the ONE DC Black Workers Center in Yes! Magazine!


Upcoming Events

4th Annual Coop Clinic - Co-op Management
Saturday, November 12 - 9 AM - 12:30 PM
3047 15th St NW - Next Step Charter School
The next Coop Clinic will be focused on strategies for better Co-op Management. The trainings will be provided by organizations involved in supporting housing cooperatives in the DC area.
Click here for more info and to RSVP

DC Ideas Fest
DC IdeasFest opens on November 17, and what will follow are four days of high-profile keynotes, ideas events and workshops to showcase solutions and innovations from every quadrant of Washington and harness all of our diversity, creativity and energy to build a stronger city, specifically targeting opportunities in the areas of education, equity, and innovation. Signature events will include idea slams, participatory theater, “What Works” workshops featuring cross-experiential groups of thinkers tackling problems such as affordable housing, and a series of “Solve This” challenges to encourage grassroots solutions to intractable problems such as closing off the school-to-prison pipeline.
Click here for more info

Admin & Organizational Management Committee
Meeting
Tuesday, November 29 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following: website, member database, social media, e-newsletter & communication, strategic planning, member events & more.
Click here to RSVP

Member Appreciation Celebration
Saturday, December 3 - 3:00 PM to 7:00 PM
RISE Demonstration Center - 2730 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE
The Member Appreciation Celebration is our end-of-year event to celebrate the wins, actions, and accomplishments of our members, donors, supporters, and volunteers. All ages are welcome as well as long-time members and new supporters.
Click here to RSVP

National Conference on Gentrification and the Destruction of Black Washington DC
Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6 - 9:00 AM & 10:00 AM
The conference will feature panels exploring, among other topics, gentrification in DC, the state of public education & the school-to-prison pipeline in DC, and policing, mass incarceration, & the enforcing of unfair sentencing laws. The conference will also include workshops on the criminal justice system, affordable housing, police brutality, political organizing, and school privatization.
Click here for more info & to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News

For the last 10 years, ONE DC has been fighting for freedom and justice. Help us celebrate our anniversary by sharing your stories of the struggle! We would love to hear your memories and reflections on your experiences with ONE DC. Tell us about a particularly memorable campaign or event that you were part of, or share your thoughts on where we’ve been and where we’re going. All you have to do is email Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org and we’ll set up a time for you to be informally interviewed.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - September 2016

"We’ve got to come together as a community and fight for what we want. Our voices have to be heard. But in numbers.” -Adriann Borum, Brookland Manor Resident & ONE DC Member


Sponsor ONE DC's Presentation of Dance Place's What's Going On: Life, Love, & Social Justice

For one night only on Friday, November 18th, ONE DC will be hosting Dance Place’s very special Marvin Gaye-inspired performance: “What’s Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice.” In Dance Place’s first full-length production, taking inspiration from 1971’s inimitable What’s Going On, Marvin Gaye’s insights into life, love and social justice are given fresh perspectives with new choreography by Vincent E. Thomas, Ralph Glenmore and Sylvia Soumah. The evening-length work features Modern, Jazz and West African dance and seeks to spark conversations to ignite change in each community it touches.

WhatsGoinOn5-photo-JonathanHsu.jpg

Dance Place has generously dedicated the performance of “What’s Going On” on November 18th to be a night of fundraising for ONE DC. The evening will begin with a reception at 6pm, followed by the performance, lasting until 9pm.

By sponsoring this event, you will contribute to our efforts to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund #Another10Years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC. Securing sponsors will also enable us to offer free/reduced price tickets to this event for our long-time members.

  • Fight for Justice - $500 – Two tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt.
  • Organize for Equity - $1,000 – Four tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt, ​copy of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Struggle by Barbara Ransby & ​Freedom is a Constant Struggle by ​Angela Y. Davis.
  • Path to Liberation - $2,000 - $5,000 – Ten tickets to tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt, copy of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Struggle by Barbara Ransby & ​Freedom is a Constant Struggle, Opportunity to speak on-stage during special performance of “What’s Going on?”

Click here to become a What's Going On? sponsor!

To make your sponsorship donation offline, please mail check to ONE DC, PO Box 26049, Washington, DC, 20001, or contact Dominic at 202-232-2915, dmoulden@onedconline.org.

You can also buy your ticket to the event here


ONE DC Welcomes New Staff!

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From Left: Nawal Rajeh, Delonte Wilkins & daughter Taylor, Madeline Hernandez, Nia Nyamweya

Delonte (Tae) Wilkins was raised in the Green Leaf community of SW as a child, then later moved to the Eckington area of NE, attending schools such as Amidon Elementary, Jefferson Junior High, then Dunbar Senior High, where he graduated. Like many youth in his era, Tae experienced violence from all angles in his life-- from street violence, poor education, to police profiling-- all forms of violence leading up to a hopeless community. Struggling to stay positive in a community of hopelessness, Tae experienced severe anxiety, accompanied with stress and depression, which led to poor choices which later landed him in prison. While in prison, Tae educated himself. He read history, law, political theory, and books on various organized rebellions. After educating himself, he learned that his condition was a result of a systematic agenda that purposely created the hardships he has endured . Shortly after his release, Tae began to organize with ONE DC after hearing about the organization from a friend in the neighborhood. Hearing the group discuss the “People's Platform,” recognizing human rights as the foundation in which a nation should be built on, sharing the same vision, Tae immediately stayed on board, motivated to help in any way possible. Tae is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: dwilkins@onedconline.org

Nawal Rajeh is the daughter of Lebanese immigrants who fled the country’s 16-year civil war and settled in Youngstown, Ohio. It was during her youth that she learned firsthand of the hardships that accompanied injustice and ignited her passion for organizing. Before coming to DC, Nawal was a community organizer in Baltimore, where she worked on joblessness and youth programs. She co-founded By Peaceful Means, which continues to run two summer programs for children in East Baltimore. Upon moving to DC eight years ago, Nawal began facilitating youth programs focusing on peace and conflict resolution in DC Public Schools. She has been a member of ONE DC for three years and is excited to continue learning and building on the legacy of resistance and alternative vision for the city that ONE DC and its members have been fighting to preserve and create. Nawal is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: nrajeh@onedconline.org

Nia Nyamweya
is a Kenyan-American, intersectional feminist organizer and activist. She is from Silver Spring, MD and received her BA from Towson University in Women’s and Gender Studies with a minor in French. Nia began organizing after college in St. Louis, Missouri when she worked with youth in the Normandy District to end the school-to-prison pipeline. Ending environmental racism and healing oppression of black women is her passion. She works part-time with the National Organization for Women (NOW) and Institute for Policy Studies (IPS). Nia happily joins ONE DC to create spaces that center black women's voices and create alternative economies. In her free time, she practices yoga and dances salsa. Nia is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: nnyamweya@onedconline.org

Madeline Hernandez was born in Washington, DC on September 1, 1998 to Salvadoran parents. Her parents immigrated to the United States a couple years before she was born, escaping from the civil unrest El Salvador was undergoing in the hopes of providing better for themselves and their future. Madeline was raised uptown in the Brightwood/ Fort Totten area where she attended the city’s public schools, such as Rudolph Elementary (before it became Latin Public Charter) and Truesdell Education Campus. She is a 2016 graduate from School Without Walls Senior High School, and it was here there that her passion for political activism and critical thought began to blossom. Her perspective as a Latina of low socioeconomic status was enough for her to have something to say in classrooms that were dominated by kids in various positions of privilege. She owes the development of her consciousness to being raised during the birth of Black Lives Matter in such a politically active city and having teachers in high school that openly discussed Feminist Theories. After graduating high school, she decided to take gap year to pursue experience in the field she plans on entering, (a double major in Women’s Studies and Social Services or Latino Affairs) and that is how she stumbled upon this organization.  Her attraction to ONE DC came from hearing one keyword: radical. For years, Madeline used “Radical” as her social media platform because she described her thought process as one that got to the root of issues by constantly asking why. Ultimately, coming to the conclusion that the institutions put in place are to blame for all of society's issues, especially when it comes to race, a conclusion that ONE DC reached years ago in its beginnings. She’s determined to channel her passion into making change within her community. Madeline is a part-time intern organizer.

We also welcome back returning interns Vincent DeLaurentis (Georgetown), Noah Wexler (George Washington), K Me (Georgetown), Citlalli Velasquez (Georgetown), and welcome Samantha Lemieux (George Washington), Jennifer Hosler (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), and Gregory Lee (Montgomery College) as new fall interns & fellows!


Turning the Light of Truth: #RentersDayofAction at Congress Heights

On Thursday, September 22nd, ONE DC, Justice First, tenants of Congress Heights, Brookland Manor, Museum Square, and our members and supporters rallied in solidarity with renters in DC and nationwide for the Renters Day of Action. Across the country, in more than 50 cities, renters rose up in powerful demonstrations of the power of everyday people standing up for racial, economic & social justice. Renters are making four major demands:
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In DC, residents living at a Congress Heights property are making another demand. Department of Housing and Community Development must take control of 3200 13th Street SE from the current owners to prevent known slum landlords and developers from gaining site control to move forward with their development plan in which they seek to displace Congress Heights tenants. Affected residents at Congress Heights and the larger neighborhood must be given priority as to determining alternative plans to create the affordable housing originally intended for the site in a manner that is beneficial to and determined by the community. Additionally, DHCD must take action to recuperate the missing $1 million from the owners of 3200, and commit to reinvesting it back into the development of 3200 to create much needed income-based affordable housing on the property as was originally intended.
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Workers with Project Retail also shared their experience with displacement in DC & request support for their petition for fair access to public transportation.

Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie

Organizing & Coalition Building Updates

People's Platform
On September 7, members of ONE DC's Shared Leadership team held a report-back with several members about decisions made during the annual Shared Leadership retreat about the future of the People's Platform. The People's Platform is a visionary framework that guides ONE DC's work, whether it be through our Right to Housing campaigns, the Black Workers Center, Cooperation DC, our resource organizing, or any other work. We seek to accomplish our goals by centering the leadership of working class black women; being funded by our base; prioritizing political education and leadership development in our work; always seeking to build a deeper analysis and assessing our work; building alternative institutions; learning from past movement's successes and limitations; championing non-reformist reforms; and always seeking to be a part of a broader movement that is multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-gender, and multi-class.

A full-time community organizer is expected to join ONE DC this fall. Monthly People's Platform General Body meetings will be held to serve as unifying political education & leader development spaces for ONE DC members across all campaigns & committees. We also seek to build up the membership of our Organizing & Member Development Committee, which will ensure our organizing, coalition building, community learning, & member development efforts are all member-led, strategic, & done interdependently.
Click here to read more about the People's Platform

Black Workers Center
Members from the Black Workers Center and Cooperation DC sat down with DMPED's Sharon Carney on September 15th to share information about the worker cooperative landscape in DC. The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development (DMPED) is beginning to develop a new economic strategy and is interested in cooperative development as part of a broader economic strategy for DC. To get involved with Cooperation DC, click here.

ONE DC Black Workers Center staff also attended a presentation by the Workforce Investment Council's Executive Director Odie Donald on September 15th. The Workforce Investment Council is "responsible for advising the Mayor, Council, and the District government on the development, implementation, and continuous improvement of an integrated and effective workforce investment system." We attended to learn more the state of workforce development in DC. ONE DC Black Workers Center members demand a shift from failed training models that don't result in actual employment, to paid, on-the-job apprenticeships.

Click here to RSVP for next monthly Black Workers Center Meeting October 20th


Upcoming Events

Admin & Organizational Management Committee Meeting
Tuesday, September 27 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following: website, member database, social media, enewsletter & communication, strategic planning, member events & more.
Click here to RSVP

All Out for Barry Farm! Rally & Hearing to Protect Public Housing
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Empower DC needs everyone who can to turn out in support of Barry Farm public housing residents. They are fighting to remain in their homes in the midst of the City’s effort to privatize the property and relocate them. The Zoning Comission has already approved the demolition, however the Barry Farm Tenants and Allies Association is appealing the decision in court. Join us to send the message that dislocation IS hardship, and the DC Housing Authority is violating the law by not protecting the needs of residents.
Click here for more info & to RSVP

Black Women Activists Needed Ages 18-50 for Focus Groups
Wednesday, September 28 - 5:30 PM
Howard University, 239 Fredrick Douglass Building
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the strategies and practices of Black women ages 18-50 years old participating in movements against police brutality and killings. These interviews will help us to better understand the attitudes of Black women activists. Additionally, factors that contribute to, or mitigate the effects of police brutality and killings on Black women activists will be explored. Assessing activists' perceptions of and experience with dealing with police violence will provide a more comprehensive picture of activists' strategies for future research and practice implications for social movements.
Refreshments provided & chance to win a gift card! Contact Shaneda Destine at shaneda.destine@bison.howard.edu (IRB Case 16-CAS-35)

Investing in the Ecosystem of Social Change
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Thursday September 29 - 6:00 PM
Impact Hub DC - 419 7th Street NW, 3rd Floor
A salon-style discussion focusing on the following questions: What are the models and initiatives that brings us closer to a more just, vibrant, and equitable human experience? How are these models creating impact? How can we support these models?
Click here for more info & to RSVP

From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation - Author Talk with Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor
Monday, October 3 - 7:00 pm
The Potter's House - 1658 Columbia Rd NW
The eruption of mass protests in the wake of the police murders of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in New York City have challenged the impunity with which officers of the law carry out violence against Black people and punctured the illusion of a postracial America. The Black Lives Matter movement has awakened a new generation of activists. In this stirring and insightful analysis, activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation.
Click here for more info & to RSVP

ONE DC Bit of Good News

ONE DC is excited to announce that our Resource Organizer Dominic Moulden, in partnership with Dr. Mindi Fullilove and Derek Hyra, have been selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Interdisciplinary Research Leader Fellow. Interdisciplinary Research Leaders will bring together researchers and on-the-ground change agents, and equip them with advanced leadership skills and a clear focus on health and equity. Together they will break down silos, address health disparities and build fundamentally healthier communities. They will build bridges between the myriad factors that have such an enormous influence on people’s health—education, neighborhoods, transportation, income, faith, and so on. They will transform our culture at every level, putting health and equity at the core.
Click here to read more



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - August 2016

"We must shake our conscience free of the rapacious capitalism, racism and patriarchy that will only ensure our own self-destruction." -Berta Caceres

Brookland Manor Families & ONE DC File Lawsuit Against Mid-City; Residents Organize Against Displacement, Harassment, & Intimidation

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Brookland Manor resident Cheryl Brunson speaks at the press conference on August 25, 2016

As you have heard, the proposed redevelopment of Brookland Manor will eliminate and reduce family-sized housing for nearly 150 families. This redevelopment will eliminate significant affordable family sized housing in the Brentwood neighborhood and force ONE DC members and residents to move from the community in which they have long resided and which they call home. The exclusion of these families from Brookland Manor destroys their community and will disrupt their children’s education and the networks of services and supports that many residents rely on. Medical doctor Mindy Fullilove calls this health condition “root shock”—a phenomena which tears up primarily Black working class communities. ONE DC’s organizing is designed to resist these conditions, and our legal team supports us in these efforts.

The developers wrote to the tenants that large families must be excluded from the redeveloped property because large families are “not consistent with the creation of a vibrant new community.” They justified the negative impact that the elimination of large units would have on families by telling the Zoning Commission that “housing very large families in apartment complexes is significantly impactful upon the quality of life of households as well as their surrounding neighbors.” These statements reflect a hostility towards families that violates both federal and District of Columbia Fair Housing laws, which prohibit discrimination based on one’s familial status. ONE DC supports our legal team through our organizing to make “the developers obey the law.” If the residents and ONE DC members don’t make the developers obey the Fair Housing laws, they will violate them. We join the families of Brookland Manor who are bringing this lawsuit in demanding that the developer obey the Fair Housing laws!

Our members and our legal team support the choice of Brookland Manor residents to have a large family or a small one, to live with multiple generations or to live alone which is protected by law. Click here to read Dominic Moulden's full remarks from the press conference.

Media Coverage of Brookland Manor

The Mysterious Private Police Force That’s Killing People In The Nation’s Capital Carimah Townes, Think Progress, August 31

DC Residents File Housing Lawsuit Against Developer Mark Segraves, NBC4 Washington, August 26

D.C. Developers Accused of Pushing Out Poor, Britain Eakin, Courthouse News Service, August 26

Brookland Residents Sue Owner Of Massive Complex Over Redevelopment Plans, Rachel Sadon, DCist, August 25

Northeast Tenants Sue Owner for Alleged Discrimination, Andrew Giambrone, Washington City Paper, August 25

As the nation’s capital booms, poor tenants face eviction over as little as $25 Terrence McCoy, Washington Post, August 8


A Reflection on Black August & Organizing with ONE DC

By Paige DeLoach, ONE DC Intern, Cornell University

During the last week of my summer internship with ONE DC, I received an email from Dominic Moulden advertising Black August, a BYP100 and BLM-DC month long event. Black August is described as “a month of rest from, reflection on, and recommitment to our decades long struggle.” Rest from the struggle, reflection on the struggle, recommitment to the struggle. An August that is Black like me. A struggle that is mine.

IMG_6863.JPGBlack August is so necessary. So often, people fighting the essential fights do not recognize their work as continued exposure to trauma. Black people face constant assaults on our personhood and our integrity. We fight for the right to inhabit our bodies, to be in charge of them, to protect and treasure them. This specific kind of fight, against racism and mistreatment, requires us to confront triggering experiences, possibly even share and re­live them, so that others see the validity of this plight. But when we must use these experiences as fuel, we are denied the chance to heal.

Black people are familiar with burnout. Black people are familiar with wounds that are cut open every day. Burnout is full of rage, hopelessness, weariness ­ a type of emptiness that is very hard to shake. Through my internship, I hoped to fight for and with those too burnt out to fight alone. I wanted to take part in fighting for the rights of Black people in my community. I wanted to build power, to provide support, to give solidarity. I wanted to give people the chance to heal.

My work at ONE DC taught me how to work for and with others, how to be an active citizen in the creation of public policy, and how a non­profit organization can help create positive and sustainable change from within a community. I met Angela Davis and Barbara Ransby; I was part of a DC artist’s inner circle for a night; I yelled at city officials; I protested.

As I look back to where I was and all ONE DC accomplished this summer, the one fact I know is that ONE DC gave me the chance to heal, because I was in need of the solidarity I was trying to provide. My rest from the struggle involved joining the struggle of others, and realizing that as I fight for others I fight for myself. We fight for one another to assure ourselves we are not helpless or hopeless, but that within us lies the power to change our world. Spaces like ONE DC and Black
August are essential to our survival, because when we come together, we lift one another up ­ we save each other.

As I return to school, I know that transitioning back to a primarily white institution will be difficult, but I am not afraid. More than anything, I am grateful to every person I met through ONE DC this summer, who helped me heal: you have made all the difference. More than anything, I am eager to come from this period of rest and reflection recommited to the struggle. More than anything, I am ready.
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“Who made us forget our past? Who can make us forget that we come from a long legacy of organizers, thinkers, and doers who understood that the fight can be long, it can be hard, but it can be won?”


Watch Video from ONE DC 10th Anniversary Juneteenth Celebration

Thank you to ONE DC member Paul Abowd for filming our 10th Anniversary Juneteenth Celebration! Click here to watch & share video of the event, including the community dialogue with Dr. Angela Davis & Dr. Barbara Ransby.

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And don't forget to make your 10th Anniversary donation to ONE DC!

 


Black Workers Continue Building Community Power in DC

Artist Edgar Reyes works with members to complete mural for new Black Workers Center space

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Join Jobs with Justice in #BlackWorkMatters Twitter Town Hall September 1st, 2:00 - 3:00 PM

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Share your story, experience, and thoughts on #BlackWorkMatters tomorrow from 2-3 PM and throughout Labor Day weekend.

  • What would our country look like if Black lives mattered in our employment and economic systems?
  • What are the biggest opportunities right now for Black communities to organize and win economic justice fights?
  • What propels and inspires you to continue working at the intersection of economic and racial justice?
  • What strategies and initiatives do you see as leading the way in dismantling the ways racism shapes our economy?
Info Session at Skyland Workforce Center

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Join Mind.Over.Matter Collective in Solidarity Demonstration to Support Incarcerated Strikers

 

Currently, incarcerated people in over 20 states, have organized to not give their labor to the prisons on Friday, Sept 9th. The United States is the most incarcerated nation in the world. Due to this, most people, whether they have served time in prisons or not, have been affected by them - family members, friends, friend's family members. This is an extremely dangerous action for them to take. So we, 'the people' on the other side of the wall have to show up and hold them through their struggles. Mind.Over.Matter, along with ally organizations, plan to hold a noise demo at the prison to support the prisoners' direct action.

Due to the nature of this action (protesting on prison grounds), this is considered a potentially arrestable action. Mind.Over.Matter collective will hold a meeting/training this Sunday September 4th 12pm-3pm at 1624 Division St. 21217 Baltimore, MD. There will be transportation for willing participants.

Click here for more info and to RSVP

For additional questions and info, email powerfularetheproactive@gmail.com

 


Upcoming Events

Black Workers Center Meeting
Thursday, September 15 - 6:00 PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
To challenge chronic black unemployment and underemployment, we must understand how race & work intersect while creating spaces where Black workers can create their own opportunities for training, employment, and worker ownership.
Click here to RSVP

ONE DC Admin & Organizational Management Committee

Tuesday, September 27 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following:

  • Writing regular blog posts or taking photos for the website
  • Website design & maintenance
  • Social media strategy
  • Monthly enewsletter & email blasts
  • Maintaining member & donor database
  • Reorganizing & archiving ONE DC documents to preserve our community learning & organizing history
  • Strategic Planning

Click here to RSVP


ONE DC Bit of Good News -  Upcoming Walking Tour Part of "What's Going On: Voices of Shaw"

Shaw Community Social Justice Walking Tour

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Thursday, September 29 - 6:00 PM
Meet at ONE DC office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
ONE DC invites you to engage with us in a conversation and community learning process about displacement and resistance in DC, and how we organize for equitable development. ONE DC will show you the physical side of gentrification in the Shaw neighborhood and discuss its effects on the community, along with stories of how ONE DC organizes with residents to stand up for community-led, equitable development. Participants will have the opportunity to raise and discuss questions together, as well as tie learned experience to the Shaw story and context. We will explore the interconnectedness of the right to housing, the right to income, and the right to wellness. Participants will walk a little less than 1 mile total. Depending on questions and reflections, tour lasts about 75-90 minutes.We are presenting this tour free to residents as part of "What’s Going On: Voices of Shaw," a public art project that examines and celebrates the micro-cultures of Shaw through the voices and diverse lens of the community. For more info or to submit your own project, click here. We welcome donations to support the organizing work of ONE DC.

Space is limited. Click here to RSVP.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - July 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

July 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"I've never been involved in all that activist stuff, but now I'm dedicated to the cause wherever there's injustice." -Mr. Green, VP of tenant association at Congress Heights, speaking at a rally in front of his slumlord's house


March Against Slumlords and WIN for Affordable Housing in Congress Heights

By Clara Lincoln

Saturday, July 23 at 11am with the temperature pushing 100 degrees, over 40 people gathered around the Cleveland Park metro station to demand an end to the slumlord control of a Congress Heights property.

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March Against Slumlords protest


Read more about the situation from Justice First here.

The protest began as people gathered at the Cleveland Park metro station, crowding into the shade of trees. Eugene Puryear of Justice First and Stop Police Terror Project DC took the mic and riled up the crowd, many of whom held signs about gentrification and slumlords. At least 5 people in the crowd were tenants either from Congress Heights or other buildings organizing to exercise their Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act (TOPA) rights in order to buy their building.

After Eugene's explanation of where we were going and why, we started our uphill, sticky march to Geoff Griffis' house. Griffis is the developer who partnered with Sanford Capital, a slumlord responsible for letting building conditions deteriorate to the point that there are roaches & rats, flooded basements, and trash sitting for months waiting to be picked up. Justice First retrieved the address through online research on Griffis' donations to Mayor Bowser's 2014 mayoral campaign -- a strategic move on Griffis' part. Griffis is also involved in the wharf development, which received $95 million worth of waterfront property from the city for only $1.00.

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Conditions at Congress Heights building

Griffis and Sanford Capital are letting the building deteriorate to try to force the tenants to move out before they can exercise their right to buy the building. But the tenants will not back down. When we arrived at Griffis' house, three tenants from Congress Heights took the mic to talk about their experiences. They expressed how inspired they were that so many people showed up on such a hot day. One said, "We've been fighting for three years. But what we want Griffis to know is you've got rid of some, but you're not getting rid of us," referring to people who have chosen to move away and stop fighting. The President and VP of the tenant association both gave inspiring speeches as people cheered and clapped. We assumed the house was empty since we saw no signs of life, but their words were as much for the crowd as for Griffis' neighbors.

After about 20 minutes of chants and testimonies, the slumlord appeared. As Schyla Pondexter-Moore from Empower DC held the mic, Griffis stepped out of his house with a box of cold water bottles. Schyla, the tenants and the crowd all turned around, rushed to the fence, and booed. Schyla said into the mic that he was no better than a slave master for the way he's treated the tenants. One tenant yelled, "We don't want your water, we want a change of heart!" Griffis opened the gate, set the box on the ground, closed the gate, gave a curt wave, and walked back inside. Check out our twitter feed to see a video of the end of the encounter. Needless to say, no one drank the water. We had brought enough of our own.

We marched and chanted back down the hill towards Connecticut Avenue. We were so fired up that we walked straight into the intersection and blocked Connecticut Avenue for a few minutes, telling passersby who Griffis was and why we were marching. Police redirected traffic even though we had no permit to block the intersection-- a testament, in my opinion, to DC police's strategy of causing as little noise as possible during protests to keep media quiet.

The protest displayed layers of solidarity. Community members and organizers came out to support the Congress Heights tenants. Luchadorxs in other buildings trying to exercise their TOPA rights showed up for a similar fight across the river. Many individuals and organizations brought water and ice to pass out. And Griffis' neighbors even stopped to listen to what we had to say. It revitalized and inspired the tenants and organizers, educated a crowd and some Cleveland Park neighbors, and left people with a follow-up action step.

Griffis and Sanford Capital want access to even more land near the Congress Heights metro station on which to build luxury apartments. As soon as Justice First found out that the WMATA board was planning to vote Thursday (today!) on whether or not to give even more land to Sanford Capital, they did what they do best-- they organized. At the march this past Saturday, they handed out information sheets like the one below urging the crowds to contact Councilmember Jack Evans, urging him to table the vote. They spread the call to action on social media as well.

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Then, Thursday morning, they learned they had won. Many ONE DC members who had emailed Evans got responses informing them of WMATA's decision. Here is the text from an email Evans sent to a ONE DC intern:

"Thank you very much for taking the time to share your thoughts on this important issue.  Upon further review of the Congress Heights sale agreement item, I agree that postponing the vote is the most prudent option at this time.  I am happy to report that the WMATA Board also agree and the item has been tabled until a later meeting."

Justice First, Congress Heights tenants, and all those who contacted Evans made this happen. Thank you to our members who called, emailed, & tweeted. This is a WIN that proves the power of collective organizing and solidarity.

But the fight isn't over. The vote will come before the board again. And the Congress Heights tenants are still living in slum conditions. Stay involved in the fight for equitable housing by following Justice First on Facebook.  #DefendAffordableHousing #SaveCongressHeights

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Black August DC 2016 - A Note from BYP100, Black Lives Matter DC, Movement for Black Lives

DC has a long and well-known history of observing Black August through the exemplary leadership and hard work of the Black August Planning Organization (BAPO).

This August, Black Youth Project 100 (BYP 100) DC and Black Lives Matter-DC (BLM DC), as part of the DC Movement 4 Black Lives Steering Committee (M4BL), are calling for a month-long observance and celebration of Black August as a month of rest from, reflection on, and recommitment to our decades long struggle. It is a call to intensify community education on ending mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex, securing freedom of all political prisoners, resisting police brutality and murder, and re-defining safety beyond policing in Black communities.

The History of Black August

Our comrades in the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement share, “Black August originated in the concentration camps (prisons) of California to honor fallen Freedom Fighters, Jonathan Jackson, George Jackson, William Christmas, James McClain and Khatari Gaulden. Jonathan Jackson was gunned down outside the Marin County California courthouse on August 7, 1970 as he attempted to liberate three imprisoned Black Liberation Fighters: James McClain, William Christmas and Ruchell Magee.”

“Black August is a time to study and practice education and outreach about our history and the current conditions of our people.” Additionally, “As the Black August practice and tradition spread, it grew to observe not only the sacrifices of the brothers in California’s concentration camps, but the sacrifices and struggles of our ancestors against white supremacy.”

Black August Events

Volunteer Meeting & Community Outreach Day
The first Volunteer Meeting for Black August will be held in the Large Meeting Room. It is really important to attend the volunteer meeting in person, but if it is absolutely not feasible but you want to volunteer please email April at keepdc4me@gmail.com as soon as possible. The Community Outreach Day will be this Saturday from 12PM to 4PM. Details will be discussed at the meeting.
TONIGHT, Thursday, July
28- 7PM to 8:30PM
Benning (Dorothy I. Height) Neighborhood Library Large Meeting Room - 3935 Benning Rd NE
Click here to RSVP


DC Night Out for Safety and Liberation
Join BYP100 DC, BLM DC, and the Movement 4 Black Lives DC for a conversation on what true public safety looks like in our city. Vendors, performances, food, story-telling, music, and fun for all ages - Night Out for Safety and Liberation is a space for our community to imagine ideas of safety that are not rooted in policing and incarceration - with specific focus on solutions beyond mythic "community-policing". Instead, join us in uplifting a narrative that speaks to investing the appropriate resources and policies needed within our communities to help support and #BuildBlackFutures. To us, #SafetyIs access to healthcare, employment, safe and dignified housing, childcare, and more. What does safety look like to you?
Tuesday, August 2 - 5:30PM to 9:30PM
The Perch- 3400 Georgia Ave NW

Click here to RSVP


Protest and Shut Down at DC Jail
Cease Fire: Don’t Smoke the Brothers and Sisters are leading a protest at DC Jail. This is a response to the death of “LT” Leslie Irby at DC Jail on July 14, 2016 as a result of the dangerously high temperatures in the jail. Cease Fire and the community have put tremendous pressure on authorities for justice with some success but now they need the whole city behind them to get justice for this death, a full investigation of the jail and its Director, the horrible conditions inside the jail, and the inhumane treatment of those inside. They also demand the immediate termination of the Director.
Wednesday, Aug
ust 3 - 1PM
DC Jail - 1901 D St SE

If you want to hold your own event as part of Black August, please send an email to wellexaminedlife@gmail.com as soon as possible. Please feel free share widely and text “KeepDC” to 91990 for updates, alerts, and actions.
Stay updated on all Black August events here!


Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift

Join the ONE DC Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift Campaign!!

For the last several months we've come together at ONE DC's Black Workers Center to create a transformative organizing campaign aimed at creating jobs and shifting the way workforce development is done in the city. For too long the District government has invested millions in jobs training programs that don't create jobs. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the Black unemployment rate in DC is 13.6% - the highest in the country.

History has taught us that the only way to change these dire statistics is to organize. In 2014, ONE DC members organized and successfully got 178 workers hired at the Marriott Marquis Hotel on Massachusetts Avenue NW. We did it before and we can do it again. Join us for our next meeting Thursday, August 19 to learn how to get involved with the ApprenticeShift campaign. We demand that the city shift from a failed jobs training model and expand opportunities for paid apprenticeships (on the job training). We'll discuss the campaign plan and timeline, outreach, and specific ways you can get involved.

Thursday, August 18 - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP


The Mousai House: A Cooperative Vision for a New Creative Economy

Check out this excerpt from a new piece about cooperative music production in Brookland, DC by local organizer and radio host Jennifer Bryant:

"The Tuesday music lessons turned into all night jam sessions, attracting the cream of the crop of local hip hop, soul, and jazz musicians. Maimouna Youssef, Tamika Love Jones, and the CooLots were there. It was an informal network of peer-to-peer knowledge sharing that operated outside of the confines of the traditional economy. 'While we were in those early stages it was a value exchange rather than a monetary exchange,' Jones shared. 'And people found value in having a creative space in which to collaborate with other artists.” This reinforces Dr. Nembhard’s belief that the next economy must move beyond the price system. 'Of particular importance,' she explains, 'is the fact that resources are not solely financial. It’s not just about market relationships.' From the beginning, this has been a core value in the Mousai House culture."

Read the full piece here!


SoulFiesta! Celebrate a Decade of Cooperative Organizing with 1417 N St Cooperative!

The 1417 N St. Cooperative (Norwood) and the City First Family invite you to honor the culmination of a decade of community organizing and progress toward creating a 83-unit limited equity cooperative. We are celebrating the renovation of our building with a community block party!

Date: Sat, July 30, 2016
Time: 4:00-7:00pm (Ribbon cutting ceremony @ 5PM)
Where: 1417 N St. NW Washington, D.C. (between Vermont Ave & 14th St. NW)

Please join us and be a part of the SoulFiesta community celebration. We will share music, art, and tamales!

Click here to RSVP


Free Books for Kids from DC Library

Register your child to receive a FREE book every month. All DC kids from birth to 5 years old can now receive free books in the mail once a month. Kids who are signed up when they are born will receive 60 free books by the time they turn 5. To sign up for this completely free program, you must register at dclibrary.org/booksfrombirth.


 

ONE DC Featured in Consumer Health Foundation Annual Report 2015 Release

 

"We have a shared responsibility to create a region in which everyone has an equal opportunity to live a healthy and dignified life. Differences in health and life expectancy between whites and people of color — which contribute to thousands of people being ill or dying in our region each year — can be avoided. Our communities can become places of opportunity through equitable public policies that enable people to get the health care they need, earn income, and generate wealth to support themselves, their families and their communities. We look forward to working across sectors in the coming months and years to achieve this vision. this decision in order to balance our intentionally high spend rate during the years following the 2008 recession (2009-2013), an uncertain and financially challenging times for our grantee partners. Now we are in a new time marked by social upheaval, and while we will continue to carefully steward the foundation’s resources, we will also take advantage of every opportunity to deepen our work on racial equity."

Read the full report here

 


Upcoming Events

DC Fund in the Sun!
Saturday, July 30 - Hosted by Brigette Rouson
Two ways to support the grassroots social justice fund for changemakers of color in the nation's capital. All proceeds go to support the Diverse City Fund.
12PM - Purse Swap at Serendipity Jazz Coffeehouse - co-host Lizette Rouson-Benefield - live music and light brunch
7 PM - Dance party at Emergence Community Arts Collective - co-host Sylvia Robinson - DJ and light snacks

Job Fair- Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
Thursday, August 11 - 10AM to 3PM
Convention Center - 801 Mt Vernon Pl NW
Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News - Black Workers Center Members Work with Muralist Edgar Reyes on Art Project

Tonight, members of the Black Workers Center will be meeting with muralist Edgar Reyes to continue discussing the design for a mural in the space. This mural will reflect the powerful intersections of organizing and art, of culture and activism. The members will guide the design process until the mural embodies the ideas and beauty in the organizing coming out of that space.

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This image is a draft of Edgar's current design for the mural. The people would likely change, as well as the whole design-- depending on what the community thinks tonight in the meeting!


 

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - June 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

June 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"This award; this is not for me, this is for the real organizers all over the country - the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do. It's kind of basic mathematics: the more we learn about who we are and how we got here, the more we will mobilize." -- Jesse Williams

ONE DC's Juneteenth 10th Anniversary Celebration

On Juneteenth Weekend, ONE DC celebrated 10 years of fighting for equity in the District!

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Thanks to the support of our extended community, this event was a glowing success.

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First, we learned and coordinated with vendors in our marketplace.

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Then, we discussed community organizing in DC with Angela Davis and Barbara Ransby.

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We heard moving testimonies by some of our members.

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Finally, we celebrated our DC with music,

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dancing,

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and togetherness.

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We at ONE DC cannot express how grateful we are for the honor of ten years of working with DC residents. Through our triumphs and our trials, we always come out on top because we have the support of a community who believes in our work. From the bottom of our heart, to our members, our volunteers, our supporters, our sponsors....

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THANK YOU!!!


Kick-Off to ONE DC's Capital Campaign!!

ONE DC's 10th Anniversary Juneteenth celebration served as the kick-off for a major capital fundraising campaign to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund #Another10Years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC.

Our organizational shero Ella Jo Baker once said, “We who believe in Freedom cannot rest." For us at ONE DC, the type of freedom we are fighting for won’t be granted by the system today. No, the freedom we need today will not be given. It must be won through political struggle.

For the last 10 years, ONE DC has been in the political struggle for freedom and justice. ONE DC has been fighting for a more just DC—a DC truly governed by the people, not corporations or the wealthy. We want justice! It’s a justice that requires housing for every person, not just those who can afford it. We must have decent and dignified and unionized work for everyone who wants it! We want a city that values people over profit—that allows us, the working-class, to democratically decide what we need in our communities. We need education that does not mentally enslave us to the inequitable systems of our day. We need free and universal education that nurtures political thinkers and leaders. We demand an end to a criminal injustice system that tears apart our families, locks up our sisters and brothers, and frees the police officers who shoot our children with impunity! And lastly, we demand self-determination, which means we must control the land and social institutions meant to rear our children and guide our work.

At ONE DC, we believe that in order to order to fulfill our mission of organizing for racial & economic equity and justice, we need to be funded by our base. That means people just like you. Because if you believe in freedom—if you believe we still have to march towards a better form of justice in the District, then you want to organize with ONE DC. We ask that if you are moved to join ONE DC’s freedom and justice struggle, then please donate today. If you want to give a dollar or a thousand—no amount is too small. We appreciate you and we need you in ONE DC’s freedom movement…because we who believe in freedom cannot rest!

If you would like to donate, click here.


Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift

Join the ONE DC Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift Campaign!!

For the last several months we've come together at ONE DC's Black Workers Center to create a transformative organizing campaign aimed at creating jobs and shifting the way workforce development is done in the city. For too long the District government has invested millions in jobs training programs that don't create jobs. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the Black unemployment rate in DC is 13.6% - the highest in the country.

History has taught us that the only way to change these dire statistics is to organize. In 2014, ONE DC members organized and successfully got 178 workers hired at the Marriott Marquis Hotel on Massachusetts Avenue NW. We did it before and we can do it again. Join us for our next meeting Thursday, July 21 to learn how to get involved with the ApprenticeShift campaign. We demand that the city shift from a failed jobs training model and expand opportunities for paid apprenticeships (on the job training). We'll discuss the campaign plan and timeline, outreach, and specific ways you can get involved.

Thursday, July 21 - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP for the next meeting


Tenants Report Lockdown Situation in Northeast DC

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"Imagine your granddaughter, age seven, is playing on the grass in front of your apartment building with a group of kids that live in your complex. You and several neighbors are watching over them. A security guard approaches and demands that you get off the grass and go on the sidewalk that lines the edges of Brentwood Road, a bustling four-lane street. This is the first time you’ve heard of this rule. Kids used to be able to play where they wanted. These new, ever-changing rules seem to be an element of the redevelopment initiative, the same initiative which is also transferring families around.

This is what Neeka Sullivan, a nine-year Brookland Manor resident, said she experienced in early May. Brookland Manor is an affordable housing complex in Northeast DC that is set to be demolished and renovated starting in 2017. Residents said they have experienced an uptick in numbers of violations and infractions given for activities like children playing on the grass or residents sitting on their front porches. 'The kids don’t have nowhere to play no more. All they have is the steps, the rails, and the trash thing,' Sullivan said, referring to a dumpster that she tries to keep the children away from."

ONE DC member Tiffany Joslin reports on the increasing mistreatment of the residents of Brookland Manor, one of the largest affordable housing complexes in the District. Brookland Manor is unique amongst affordable housing complexes because it contains a large number of multiple bedroom units, which make the complex home to many families. Despite this, Brookland Manor is slated for redevelopment - so often a code word for displacement and gentrification - and residents, their tenants association, ONE DC, and the Washington Lawyers Committee are fighting for Brookland Manor's future. Amidst this tension, security harassment and mistreatment have increased, contributing to the sentiment residents are receiving from management. All this difficulty and mistreatment sends a clear message: Brookland Manor residents are no longer welcome, and management will do what it can to make residents want to leave.

Residents are angry, and they are ready to fight. They are organizing with ONE DC and the Washington Lawyers Committee to demand a one to one replacement of units based on size and number. They are meeting with lawyers, they are not moving out - and they are not afraid.

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To read all of Joslin's enlightening report, click here.


ONE DC Member Testimony: Virginia Lee

My fellow ONE DCers,

Those are strong who recognize that HOPE is not a strategy.  Many of you are credentialed to pursue other walks of life but remain committed to the vision of ONE DC. I have always found admirable the level of full participation you give to this mission every day in so many ways. You fearlessly bring your best game to the pursuits of ONE DC's overarching goal of social justice for all of our community.

Over the past 10 years you have given yourself up to learning daily about your gifts and your shortcomings in doing this vitally important work. The work you do encompasses an intrinsic respect for everyone's contribution. Through meaningful dialogue and authentic justice making action you make clear what your audience needs to know. You also maintain a keen awareness for how these actions will impact our community.

It has been my good fortune to share a portion of your journey. You have always inspired me with your ability to pull the proverbial rabbit out of the hat, when it comes to funding, and for having an energy level that could quite easily power an energy company. You have such a wonderful story to tell about managing an ever-changing landscape as a non-profit organization. This celebration is living proof of what happens when you have a vision that continues to attract others to the cause. After 10 hard fought years you are the most deserving of CELEBRATION.

Now stand for your APPLAUSE!!!!!! Congratulations!!!!!

My warmest regards,
Virginia C Lee


Looking to Live in a Housing Cooperative?

The housing co-op of 1417 N Street NW is currently offering affordable studio living spaces with a variety of features. By owning a share in this co-op, you can have affordable long-term housing while managing your building.

Centrally located in Logan Circle, amenities include HVAC, remodeled bathrooms, a laundry room, bike storage, and more. Units available include the small studio (225 square feet) and the studio (330 square feet); respectively valued at approximately $950/month and $1,144/month. Costs cover maintenance, insurance, water, and payments to the co-op blanket mortgages. Resident pays electric & gas.

To qualify for the apartment, you must undergo credit and background checks, demonstrate an interest in co-op participation, and have income between the minimum and maximum values. For more information, contact Hernan Sotomarino at 202.630.1417 Se habla español.

Click here for more information


The Pleasant Park Cooperative is Looking for New Members!

The Pleasant Park Cooperative is a 60 unit Affordable Housing Community located near 63rd St NE and Eastern Ave NE . There are currently 2-bedroom newly renovated town-homes available starting July 1st. The homes feature: open kitchens with breakfast bar, in unit laundry machine, rear and front porches, in unit heating and cooling systems. Resident ONLY pays electric. 

This Cooperative is right across from the Capitol Heights Metro. Its location also offers close proximity to the Marvin Gaye park, and easy access to Downtown DC, Maryland, and Virginia. Applications can be picked up at the management office, EJF Real Estate 1428 U Street NW, 2nd Floor. There is a $40 fee for each application. The application requires a background and credit check.

For more information on membership and income qualification, click here.

 


Upcoming Events

Black Workers Center Meeting
Thursday, July 21 - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP for the next meeting


ONE Bit of Good News - Punk Rock for the people with Positive Force DC

Positive Force, an activist collective of musicians and artists in DC, held a benefit show on June 3rd to raise funds for ONE DC. The event showcased Positive Force members' immense talent and their dedication to justice for all DC residents. ONE DC would like to extend a huge thank you to Positive Force for helping to raise over $200 for the fight for equity in the District!! Check out their work on their website or follow them @positiveforcedc on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

http://www.positiveforcedc.org/


 

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - May 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

May 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"I'm here because I wish I could wave a magic wand and bring back all of the people that have had to leave DC."
-Ms Ivy Kayira, on why she organizes with ONE DC

 


Buy Your Tickets for ONE DC's Juneteenth 10th Anniversary Celebration

Join ONE DC in celebrating 10 years of organizing for racial and economic equity in the District!

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Saturday, June 18
1:00 - 4:00 PM - Community Marketplace & Dialogue with Dr. Angela Davis & Dr. Barbara Ransby
Jack Morton Auditorium, George Washington University, 801 21st NW
5:00 - 11:00 PM - Celebration w/ Food, Live Music, & Dancing
Bolivarian Hall, 2445 Massachusetts Ave NW

ONE DC's 10th Anniversary Juneteenth celebration will include a community dialogue on community organizing & movement building featuring Dr. Angela Davis and Dr. Barbara Ransby, and an evening of soul, celebration and reclamation through music and dance. The event will also serve as the kick-off for a major capital fundraising campaign to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund another 10 years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC. We hope you not only will join us in celebration, but also make a donation toward our capital campaign. 

Visit ONEDC10thAnniversary.org to find out more about transportation, childcare, and how you can support our 10th Anniversary as a sponsor or vendor.

Click here to buy your $20 tickets and support ANOTHER 10 YEARS of organizing in DC!

You can ask to reserve a free or reduced ticket by clicking here.


First Annual East of the River Food Justice Conference

Cooperation DC is involved with others in the planning of the First Annual East of the River Food Justice Conference to support emerging food coops in wards 7 and 8.

There are also other ways to get involved with Cooperation DC:
CHILDCARE: support the development of an emerging childcare cooperative in NW.
POPULAR EDUCATION: Help plan and continue our popular wisdom circle series and other community learning sessions.
ORG DEVELOPMENT: Do you have website, graphic design or social media skills? This is the working group for you!

Email dcworkercoops@gmail.com or contact 202.957.4987 to find out more!


The Black Workers Center at The United Black Fund

ONE DC has been preparing to transform the basement of the United Black Fund into a fully functional and permanent space for the new Black Workers Center. United Black Fund CEO Barry LeNoir has graciously offered to allow ONE DC to use the space for free. LeNoir first heard about ONE DC while we were organizing for the Marriott Marquis Jobs Training Program, and began following the group’s activities when ONE DC began protesting a lack of enforcement of DC’s First Source hiring law. He says he especially appreciates the relationships that ONE DC fosters in the community, because they form networks of committed individuals working collectively for change.

Now, LeNoir says that he is “honored” to provide ONE DC the space for the District’s first Black Workers Center. He says that the United Black Fund is “prepared to support the movement in whatever way possible.” According to LeNoir, the United Black Fund’s location makes it the ideal space for the DC Black Worker’s Center. To him, Ward 8, ­­the ward with the highest unemployment rate,­­ is experiencing an “unemployment nightmare,” and the Black Workers Center “goes right into the heart of the challenge.” That is why he permitted and encouraged ONE DC to host planning meetings for the Black Workers Center starting in 2015.

The Black Workers Center space will be comprised of two rooms-- one for conference space and one for desk­-based community learning and jobs training. ONE DC intends to install computers and redecorate the interior of the space. ONE DC envisions a constant stream of local residents, many of whom have already committed to be volunteers. The goal is to build power with Black workers and begin reversing what LeNoir called a “flow away of wealth from longtime DC natives and residents.”

This “flow back” will occur through the achievement of the Black Workers Center’s five main goals. Our members envision:

  • A center for finding and creating positive, dignified Black work and training.
  • An incubation space for alternatives to low-­wage work, such as worker cooperatives, collectives, and small businesses created, owned, and operated by Black workers.
  • A place to openly discuss the intersection of race and work, particularly what it means to be "working while Black," as well as a place for Black workers to positively recognize their Blackness.
  • An environment to challenge bad employers who exploit, cheat, & steal from their workers.
  • An educational space to talk about ways to work safer and for more money and benefits.

Join us for the next meeting!
Thursday, June 23rd - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP

These goals can only be reached with support from ONE DC supporters. Click here to donate.


ONE DC is Hiring Part-Time Apprentices Organizers

ONE DC is seeking creative and dynamic individuals with a genuine interest in learning about and getting on-the-ground experience with community organizing. Successful candidates will:

  • Support organizing strategy for the People's Platform, Right to Housing, or Black Workers Center campaigns while collaborating with DC residents and workers, ONE DC staff, and ONE DC members
  • Recruit and develop relationships with ONE DC members by conducting roughly 5-10 hours of outreach via phone banking, one-on-one visits, and neighborhood door-knocking per week.
  • Assist in the planning and implementation of ONE DC organizational events.
  • Support leadership development of ONE DC members, DC residents and workers.
  • Perform organizing campaign related administrative tasks, such as updating the Nation Builder database, ONE DC website, or social media as needed.
  • Research topics and legislation related to issues the People's Platform or Black Workers Center is working on.
  • Attend staff meetings and planning sessions

Click here for more information and how to apply

 


ONE Bit of Good News - Accolades, Awards, & Appreciation

ONE DC Shared Leadership Team Member Jessica Gordon Nembhard Inducted into 2016 Cooperative Hall of Fame
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A cooperative ambassador, economist and community economic development expert, Dr. Jessica Gordon Nembhard is author of the recently published book, Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice. The result of 15 years of careful research, the book solidifies Gordon Nembhard as a historian of cooperative empowerment and transformation within low-income and minority communities. Her book argues that co-ops not only should be, but have historically been a social justice tool within African American communities.
Watch the video to learn about Jessica's journey to the Coop Hall of Fame!
Congratulations Jessica!

ONE DC Resource Organizer Dominic Moulden Receives 2016 Maryland-DC Campus Compact Civic Leadership Award
Recognizes an individual who has contributed substantially to the development of civic and community engagement in the Maryland-DC region. Nominees are public servants, non-profit, or other community leaders who have helped to create a culture of community-engagement an improved community life within the Maryland-DC region.

"On behalf of the Yale Chaplains’ OffIce and our group of Chaplaincy Fellows, we want to offer our heartfelt gratitude to ONE DC - the Shared Leadership Team, staff and members. You inspire us and help to remind us that real change is possible through hard work and dedication. Yale’s Chaplaincy Fellows are a group of diverse sophomores who spend a week in DC to both learn about community challenges and visit different religious spaces. Our students this year learned so much from your leadership strategy and community empowerment work. One DC has become a role model for what successful but difficult racial justice work can look like. I’m sure our students will implement the lessons they learned from One DC in their own campus activism and beyond. THANK YOU!!!" -Yale students visited ONE DC for a walking tour


 

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - April 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

April 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"Freedom! Freedom! I can't move
Freedom, cut me loose!
Yeah, freedom! Freedom! Where are you?
Cause I need freedom too!
I break chains all by myself
Won't let my freedom rot in hell
Hey! I'ma keep running
Cause a winner don't quit on themselves."
-Beyonce, "Freedom," LEMONADE

 


Join the ONE DC Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift Campaign

For the last several months we've come together at ONE DC's Black Workers Center to create a transformative organizing campaign aimed at creating jobs and shifting the way workforce development is done in the city. For too long the District government has invested millions in jobs training programs that don't create jobs. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the Black unemployment rate in DC is 13.6% - the highest in the country.

History has taught us that the only way to change these dire statistics is to organize. In 2014, ONE DC members organized and successfully got 178 workers hired at the Marriott Marquis Hotel on Massachusetts Avenue NW. We did it before and we can do it again. Join us for our next meeting Thursday, May 19th to learn how to get involved with the ApprenticeShift campaign. We demand that the city shift from a failed jobs training model and expand opportunities for paid apprenticeships (on the job training). We'll discuss the campaign plan and timeline, outreach, and specific ways you can get involved.

Thursday, May 19 - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP for the next meeting


ONE DC's Juneteenth 10th Anniversary Celebration

Monday, May 9 - 6:30 - 8:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House

ONE DC will be celebrating our 10th Anniversary on Juneteenth weekend - Saturday, June 18th! Using the theme of Celebration, Reclamation, and Radical Imagination, we are working to develop a day of stellar programming and we need your support:

  • Contacting vendors & partners to participate in a pop-up marketplace
  • Lending your creative talent as artists, singers, spoken word/poets, or performers to the program
  • Helping with phone banking and mailings, managing ticket sales and RSVPs
  • Sharing your own story about what it means to be a ONE DC member and organize for your rights in DC
  • And more!

Click here to RSVP for the next planning meeting


Cooperation DC Meeting

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Cooperation DC’s mission is to expand dignified employment opportunities in low-income communities of color through the development of worker cooperatives, businesses owned and managed democratically by their employees. Our vision is a city and world where all workers – especially those of us who have been most marginalized by our current economy – reap the benefits of our labor, have a meaningful voice in the workplace, and apply those democratic practices to other areas of our civic lives. Come find out what's happening this year with Cooperation DC and how you can get involved!

Sunday, May 15 - 2PM
Shaw/Watha T. Daniel Library - 1630 7th St NW

Click here to RSVP


Looking to Live in a Housing Cooperative?

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The housing co-op of 1417 N Street NW is currently offering affordable studio living spaces with a variety of features. By owning a share in this co-op, you can have affordable long-term housing while managing your building.

Centrally located in Logan Circle, amenities include HVAC, remodeled bathrooms, a laundry room, bike storage, and more. Units available include the small studio (225 square feet) and the studio (330 square feet); respectively valued at approximately $950/month and $1,144/month. Costs cover maintenance, insurance, water, and payments to the co-op blanket mortgages. Resident pays electric & gas.

To qualify for the apartment, you must undergo credit and background checks, demonstrate an interest in co-op participation, and have income between the minimum and maximum values. For more information, contact Hernan Sotomarino at 202.630.1417 Se habla español.

Click here for more information


Upcoming Events

 

Pan-African May Day March for Alonzo Smith
Sunday, May 1 - 3:00 PM
Marbury Plaza  - 2300 Good Hope Rd SE
May 1st marks the 6th month anniversary of the murder of Alonzo Smith and is International Worker’s Day or “May Day,” that grew out of the efforts of radical labor organizers. Alonzo was a remarkable education worker and his death is a terrible tragedy that has yet to see justice served. To show that 6 months later Alonzo Smith is missed but never forgotten, there will be a march led by Beverly Smith of Pan-African Community Action and mother of Alonzo starting at Marbury Plaza to the 7th District Station, 2455 Alabama Ave., SE. There will be a rally at both locations with speakers and cultural expression.
Click here to RSVP

DC May Day March & Rally
Sunday, May 1 - 2:00 PM
Malcolm X Park - 2400 15th ST NW
On  May 1st, millions of workers across the globe will express international solidarity by banding together to march in honor of May Day.
Click here to RSVP

"Collective Courage" Wisdom Circle, Part III
Thursday, May 5 - 7:00 - 9:00 PM
Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library - 1630 7th St NW
Join us for Part 3 of the Collective Courage Wisdom Circle. For the first hour, Jennifer Bryant will interview author Dr. Jessica Gordon Nembhard. The second hour will be reserved for community dialogue, introspection, & visioning. We look forward to a lively discussion for the last section of Collective Courage!
Click here to RSVP

"Peace, Jobs, & Justice" - DC Labor Chorus & Not What You Think
Saturday, May 14 – 7:00 PM
Washington Ethical Society - 7750 16th St NW
For the first time ever, two of DC’s premier singing groups, Not What You Think and the DC Labor Chorus, join forces for “Peace, Jobs and Justice,” a concert of their best songs! Tickets $20. For more information, call 202-215-2902.
Click here to purchase advance tickets

DCRA Protection Now!
Saturday, May 14 - 1:00 - 3:00 PM
Northeast Neighborhood Library 330 7th St NE, Mezzanine Conference Room 2nd floor
Residents demand protection from the DC Regulatory Agency (DCRA) and developers. You and your home are under siege by developers who are building out (Popbacks) and up (Popups) beside your property without abiding by the DCRA Construction Codes and Rules. DCRA is not willing to go against rogue developers to protect D.C. residents.
Email Tolu at dcraprotectionow@gmail.com or call 202-331-4418 for more info about upcoming meetings in June and July & to be added to the email list.


Raise the Wage: Canvas with #DCfor15 this Saturday!

This Saturday, April 30 at 10:30 AM, ROC-DC will be hitting the streets, telling DC voters about our petition to raise the wage to $15 per hour for all, and collecting the signatures needed to put it on the people's ballot box come November! Meet us at the African American Civil War Memorial, at the 10th St exist of the U St metro station.

If passed, under our ballot initiative, the District's minimum wage will increase annually until it reaches $15 per hour in 2020, after which the minimum wage will be adjusted each year according to increases in the cost of living. The initiative will additionally increase the minimum wage of tipped employees to $15 per hour by 2025, bringing DC's restaurant workers to #1FairWage.

Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News - 150 Attend 3rd Annual Equitable Development Conference

"A right to the city’ summarizes the banner under which we should be marching. Under that banner, fundamentally, this has to be a working class movement to defend the ability of working class people to remain in and flourish in cities. It needs to be a movement against gentrification and the racial cleansing of cities.” -Bill Fletcher, Jr.

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Click here to read the full article about "Movement or a Moment"


 

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - March 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

March 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"Changing the structure and rules of the global economy will require a mass movement based on messages of compassion, justice, and equality, as well as collaborative and democratic processes ... if we stay positive, inclusive, and democratic, we have a truly historic opportunity to build a global movement for social justice." -Medea Benjamin, CODEPINK

 


Thank You to Our Supporters Who Believe 'Another World is Possible'!

Our members are always finding innovative ways to help ONE DC raise funds. To celebrate her 30th birthday, Iimay Ho hosted a fundraiser for ONE DC to highlight the Black Workers Center project. Several local businesses were represented at the event: holistic wellness center Freed Bodyworks provided the venue, veggie and gluten-free friendly food were from Zenful Bites, and cupcakes were from Grassroots Gourmet. Folk healer Richael Faithful of the Conjure! Freedom Collective kicked off the evening with a drum meditation on the topic of "seeds we have sown," and Dominic referenced this theme as he shared how ONE DC has sown the seeds of justice in DC for 10 years. Iimay is grateful to have had the chance to support ONE DC through this community celebration!

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Click here to donate to ONE DC


Call for Volunteers for ONE DC's Juneteenth/10th Anniversary Celebration

Monday, April 11 - 6:30 - 8:30 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House

ONE DC is looking for volunteers to assist with the production of the ONE DC Juneteenth/10-year Anniversary Celebration! Using the theme of Soul, Celebration, and Reclamation we are working to develop a day of stellar programming and we need your support. We are building a dynamic team to help in different ways: 

  • Developing cultural and creative programming; 
  • Executing on the planning and; 
  • Managing event activities the day of
Interested in bringing your time and talents to one or all of these areas? Come and learn more volunteer opportunities for the  ONE DC Juneteenth/10-year anniversary Celebration on April 11th, 6:30 - 8:30pm at the ONE DC office. 

Click here to RSVP


This is What the Movement Looks Like!

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On February 25, residents from Mt Vernon Plaza and Museum Square united to speak out against eviction by their landlord, Bush Companies. The tenants demand respect and the right to stay in their homes without harassment and intimidation. With the support of ONE DC, API Resistance, and other partners & allies, a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, intergenerational group of over 100 tenants and allies traveled to Arlington, VA to stand up for their human right to housing.

Click here to view photos & summary from the action

Taking action works! Last week, Mount Vernon Plaza residents learned they will receive thousands of dollars in reimbursements after being forced by Bush Companies to overpay on their rent for nearly 2 years. Congratulations Mount Vernon Plaza!


A Moment or a Movement? Why Black Lives Matter on the Path to Equitable Development in Washington, DC

Tuesday, April 5 - 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Movement building is the focus of the third annual conference on equitable development in Washington, DC co-sponsored by ONE DC and George Washington University. Bringing together residents from all parts of the DC area, organizers, students, developers, elected officials and all who are concerned with sustainable, equitable development, this conference will build on the ongoing efforts to create a more democratic and just community. The day will also include DC Study Tours in the afternoon exploring the themes of resident-led development, community organizing and resistance.

Click here to register for the conference & tour

We still need volunteers to help during the conference & tours. Please email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org if you can volunteer!


Upcoming Events

 

"Collective Courage" Wisdom Circle, Part II
Sunday, April 3 - 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Watha T. Daniel/Shaw Library - 1630 7th St NW
Join us to discuss Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice, written by ONE DC and Shared Leadership Team member Jessica Gordon Nembhard.
Click here to RSVP

Democracy Awakening 2016
- Teach, Learn, Transform
Saturday, April 16 – 12:00 PM – 9:00 PM
All Souls Church, 1500 Harvard Street NW
Saturday (Emancipation Day) will feature workshops, teach-ins and art at the intersections between voting rights, money and politics and the struggles for a healthy living planet, criminal justice reform, a fair economy, workers rights, empowered young people and more. This is part of a weekend-long mobilization April 16-18 to protect voting rights, get big money out of politics and demand fair consideration of the Supreme Court nominee. Democracy Awakening is a broad coalition of organizations representing the labor, peace, environmental, student, racial justice, civil rights and money in politics reform movements.
Click here for more information

DC May Day March & Rally
Sunday, May 1 - 2PM
Malcolm X Park - 2400 15th ST NW
On  May 1st, millions of workers across the globe will express international solidarity by banding together to march in honor of May Day.
Click here to RSVP


Hill-Snowdon Foundation Maps Black-Led Organizing

"In addition to the 20 or so Black-led organizing groups that we are able to support directly through the MBLM Initiative, we know that there is a much larger ecosystem of dynamic Black-led community organizing groups that are doing important work - but are under-resourced because they are not on the radar of many donors. Consequently a key feature of the MBLM Initiative is to develop an on-line searchable database and of Black-led community organizing groups in the US, so that we can literally put these important groups on the map." -Hill-Snowdon Foundation

Click here to check out the map of Black-led community organizing


ONE Bit of Good News - A Word From a New Member

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Thank you Michael for demonstrating what it means to be a ONE DC member! Click here to join today.


 

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - February 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

February 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"We have a chance here to teach industrial and cultural democracy to a world that bitterly needs it." - W.E.B. DuBois

 


Radical Black Organizing: Fund #BlackWorkersMatter Organizing through the DC Black Workers Center

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To learn more, contact Resource Organizer Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org.


Join us at the Annual Membership Meeting

Saturday, March 5 - 2:00 - 5:00 PM
Thurgood Marshall Center - 1816 12th St NW, Gymnasium

What is the people's vision for 2016 and beyond? What is ONE DC's financial standing? How did we win in 2015? How can you get more involved as a member and a leader? Who is on the Shared Leadership Team and how does it function?  Join us to find out! All ages welcome. Food will be served. Please let us know if you need transportation.

Click here to pay your 2016 membership dues

Membership dues and donations are used to build a people's movement funded by the people. Join ONE DC and support us in building power with long-time DC residents to organize for an equitable city.

RSVP Here


Freedom School - Dispossession, Displacement, & Resistance

Saturday March 12 - 12:00 - 4:00 PM
St. Stephen's Church - 1525 Newton Street NW

ONE DC's next Freedom School will focus on Dispossession, the second wheel in the 'Four Wheels of Capitalism' (Exploitation, Dispossession, Repression, & Oppression). We will explore the issue of land dispossession & displacement, learn about root, structural causes, and highlight national and international examples of community resistance to dispossession.

Freedom School will include discussion, group breakouts and exercises, videos, fellowship with other ONE DC members, and more. All ages welcome. Food will be served. Please let us know if you need transportation.
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ONE DC Freedom Schools are community learning events based on the tradition of the Mississippi Freedom Schools organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) during the summer of 1964. The goal of the Freedom Schools was to be "an educational experience for students which will make it possible for them to challenge the myths of our society, to perceive more clearly its realities, and to find alternatives, and ultimately, new directions for action." Using question-posing techniques (the same techniques as popular education and popular theater), the SNCC Freedom Schools were a progressive and radical education project.

RSVP here


Learning from the Past to Promote Our Future

Wisdom Circle: Collective Courage

On the afternoon of Sunday, February 21, a dozen ONE DC, Cooperation DC, and Black Workers Center members and organizers gathered to discuss Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice, written by ONE DC and Shared Leadership Team member Jessica Gordon Nembhard.

The group discussion, centered around Part I of Collective Courage, highlighted inspiring examples of cooperative groups working toward collective ownership. These examples demonstrate the resiliency of Black communities to build together in the face of extreme prejudice and threats to undermine that collective strength. The group discussion emphasized the importance of political organizing and action in building economic power.

Multiple groups highlighted in the book experienced active attempts to derail or discredit them, and therefore encountered higher incidences of failure than white ventures. The Wisdom Circle posited that without political or legal backing, economic development initiatives today would also encounter similar roadblocks. However, the Wisdom Circle also discussed that by building economic power for ourselves, we might free resources and time to be able to contribute more substantially to critical political efforts to change the structures that create macro-level inequality. There was hope expressed that ONE DC and the Wisdom Circle itself will continue to foster an environment that links politics and economics in critical ways to build Black economic power and dismantle inequitable economic structures.

Overall, through learning examples of cooperative strength, we can both motivate ourselves to strive for success while applying the principles of what works best to achieve longevity in collective economic power. As education is a core element of this cooperative strength, learning of past collective efforts will help us develop better cooperative projects moving forward.

To buy your own copy of Collective Courage, email organizer@onedconline.org. Sliding scale $25- $40. Proceeds go directly to fund the organizing work of ONE DC.

The Wisdom Circle will meet again for Part II of Collective Courage on Sunday, April 3

For more on Collective Courage, Jessica Gordon Nembhard's interview with Laura Flanders can be found here


Cooperation DC Seeking a Fellow

Through our partnership with Building for Progress, ONE DC is seeking a fellow to s​upport our work. Tasks include:

-Creating graphics that simplify complex housing, work, and other concepts
-Creating popular education materials for ONE DC members and the public
-Researching and writing real-time responses that share the People’s Platform perspective on issues
-Supporting our social media organizing efforts
-Joining People’s Platform and campaign meetings
-Other ad hoc assignments

The fellow will be paid $15/hr. The number of hours worked per week is somewhat flexible and can be agreed upon with the coordinator.

Qualifications include:

-Graphic design skills​;
-Strong research and writing skills;
-Good communication and interpersonal skills;
-Self-motivated and skilled at working as part of a team;
-Knowledge of Washington, DC issues and organizations;
-Learn about and commit to ONE DC’s organizing model;
-A desire to deepen political analysis and learn about the history of social movement​s;
-Willingness to engage in honest, though constructive, mindful, and compassionate reciprocal critique of work with others.

To apply, please send a resume, writing sample, and graphic design sample to DCWorkerCoops@gmail.com by February 27th. People of color, women, DC residents, and youth are encouraged to apply.


Upcoming Events

 

Capital Dilemma Book Launch 
Thursday, February 25  - 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
School of International Service (SIS) Founders Room, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Join us for a breakfast discussion & book launch of Capital Dilemma: Growth and Inequality in Washington, DC. The book uncovers and explains the dynamics that have influenced the contemporary economic advancement of Washington, DC. The book talk will feature co-editors Derek Hyra and Sabiyha Prince, as well AU's Dr. Brett Williams.
RSVP Here

This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed - Author Talk with Charles Cobb
Saturday, February 27  - 7:00 - 9:00 PM
The Potter's House - 1658 Columbia Rd NW
In this author talk, Charles E. Cobb Jr. will discuss his book, This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed, which lays bare the paradoxical relationship between the nonviolent civil rights struggle and the long history and importance of African Americans taking up arms to defend themselves against white supremacist violence.
RSVP Here

Promised Land -  presented by Mosaic Theater Company of DC
Saturday, February 27 - 8:00 PM
Woolly Mammoth Theater - 641 D St NW
Promised Land is a documentary-infused kaleidoscope chronicling the waves of Sudanese refugees who crossed the desert to enter Israel legally and illegally, finding themselves stranded in a drama of relocation and displacement. We are happy to be co-hosting the show which will feature a post-show discussion with Marybeth Onyeukwu (ONE DC), Mac Hamilton (STAND), and Bob Schlehuber (Mosaic Theater, RPCV Ukraine). We are offering tickets for $20 dollars with the code "promisecorps".
RSVP Here

Spring Member Orientation

Monday, March 14, 2016 at 6:00 PM
United Black Fund, 2500 MLK Jr. Ave SE
We welcome all supporters of ONE DC, whether long-time members or new joiners, to join us for our Spring Member Orientation to learn more about ONE DC's mission, committees, campaigns, structure, organizing style, and what it means to be a member of ONE DC.
RSVP Here


One Bit of Good News - A Fresh Look!

The ONE DC office has been repainted! Thank you to TightShift Laboring Coop & our many ONE DC members & volunteers who helped paint & clean, & donated to this effort. Thank you to Moriah Fund & Hill-Snowdon Foundation for small grants toward office revitalization & technology upgrades.

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We are giving away office supplies that we no longer need to anyone who wants them. If no one claims by March 4, they will be donated:
-File cabinets
-File folders & hanging folders
-Keyboards
-Binders
-Assorted office supplies
-Artwork & photographs

Email ccook@onedconline.org if you are interested in picking up any of these items. We invite you all to stop by the office to check out the new look!


 

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