ONE DC Monthly Voice - April 2017

La shukran ala wajib // No need to thank me because it is a duty

-Arabic expression shared by ONE DC Member Sara Swetzoff

Just because you can't do what everyone else does, doesn't mean your life stops

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This month we celebrate the leadership of a ONE DC member, Angie Whitehurst. A survivor of a rare form of cerebral malaria, Angie reminds us that we each have unique talents that we can mobilize to serve our community. As a leader in ONE DC's Black Workers Center Chorus, member of the Administrative committee, and a long-time DC resident, Angie is an example of grace-filled resilience and hope.

While working in international development abroad, Angie contracted a rare form of malaria. Her recovery required her to cut down her work hours and slow her lifestyle. She then supplemented her work with volunteering and organizing. In Angie’s words, "just because you can't do what everyone else does, doesn't mean your life stops. Doesn't mean your brain stops."

When Angie was a young woman living with her family in NW DC, her family’s neighborhood was claimed by eminent domain. On the day President Kennedy was assassinated in 1963, she and her neighbors moved out of their homes. They built a new home in Petworth. Years later, when plans were forming to build the Metro in Petworth and demolish the homes in the space, Angie and her family organized to ensure their homes were preserved and they were included in the changes in Petworth.

Angie sees the same thing happening at Brookland Manor: development that is neither inclusive nor just. "I call it loopholes. The government doesn't say you have to move, but when people buy buildings just for speculation, flipping, without your participation... it's ethically and morally wrong."

That’s why Angie is a member and leader with ONE DC. She embodies resilience, and she raises all of our spirits with her songs and her stories.

Become a member of ONE DC and volunteer your energy, spirit, and leadership.  


We Don't Do Pacification Work. We Do Liberation Work.

And when you do the liberation work, you need to be funded by your base. ONE DC is raising $1.3 million to purchase & renovate a building to permanently house the first Black Workers Center in the District of Columbia. A community-controlled space is critical to building power through political education and leadership development with an emphasis on Black workers.

It is essential that ONE DC, a Black-led organization, operate from a liberated space East of the River, where unemployment rates are the highest in the city and where residents are vulnerable to a new wave of mass displacement and gentrification.

With a Black Workers Center space, ONE DC will be able to house equipment for time banking programs, host national and international visitors who want to learn about organizing in DC, and build a political movement to fight for control over housing, land, and labor.

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On April 22, a group of ONE DC members, local artists, activists, organizers, & community members, and hip-hop artist Talib Kweli convened at the Black Workers Center space in Anacostia to discuss grassroots organizing in DC. Watch the video here

With Tax Day behind us, please consider donating all or part of your refund toward our campaign! And don't forget to share on Facebook & Twitter!


Carry the Water: Represent ONE DC in Coalition Building and Outreach Efforts

Help ONE DC be a stronger coalition partner! Check out the below campaigns. If any interest you, you can become more involved by committing to attend coalition meetings, volunteer (and recruit other ONE DC members to volunteer) with campaign committees, and sharing updates with our larger membership. We will schedule a leader development orientation with anyone interested so you can learn more about what it means to represent ONE DC and build strong organizational partnerships.

Coalition Building

DC ReInvest
In solidarity with Standing Rock, we demand D.C. sever its ties with Wells Fargo and other banks funding the Dakota Access Pipeline. We seek to send a message to
the fossil fuel and finance industries: that there is a price to pay for investing in dirty infrastructure and human rights violations. We further demand that D.C. reinvest in justice and self-determination for our communities. D.C. must invest in efforts to end police brutality, pursue a just energy transition, protect communities under threat, and empower our communities. We will work with coalition partners and allies around the DMV area to shape our vision for D.C.’s future and bring our demands to the Mayor and City Council.
Click here to learn more

Put A Price On It D.C. - Carbon Rebate Coalition
The "Put a Price on It D.C." campaign was born from the shared understanding that only a rising price on pollution can be strong enough to close the gap. So, the coalition set out to pass the first progressive carbon fee in the nation, and fulfill D.C.’s goals of inclusive prosperity in a walkable, livable, sustainable city. On Friday, April 28th at 9:30am the coalition is planning a literature drop at all of the council members offices. RSVP to Jeremiah Lowery at jeremiah@chesapeakeclimate.org if you can make it!
Click here to learn more

Save Our System Coalition: FIX IT, FUND IT, MAKE IT FAIR
Thursday April 27th - 2:00 - 4:00 PM
815 16th St NW - President's Room, 1st Floor
*All meeting participants will need an ID to enter building.
WMATA services are a vital economic lifeline for residents of DMV region, especially the most public transit dependent populations of low-income workers, persons with disabilities, senior citizens, and students.
Click here to learn more

DC Fair Elections
Make D.C. elected officials more accountable to D.C. residents. Give candidates a way to fund their campaigns by motivating supporters in the communities they serve, rather than high-dollar donors looking for a sweetheart deal in return. Provide a bullhorn to ensure the voices of everyday citizens are continually heard in the Wilson Building. Increase the range of choices by giving grassroots-oriented candidates a means to get their message out.
Click here to learn more

Outreach


New Communities for Children Community Fair
Saturday, May 6th - 1:00 - 4:00 PM
614 S St NW - Back Parking Lot at ONE DC
We need: 2-4 members/supporters to table for ONE DC (distribute flyers, sign up interested people, spread the word!)

Resourcing Our Resistance, Nurturing Our Connections: A DC TimeBank Movement Makers Fair
Saturday May 6th -  12:00 - 3:30 PM

Crispus Attucks Park - 23 U St NW
DC, let’s exchange resources to build resistance! Join the DC Time Bank and local changemakers for a day in the park at the second Movement Makers Fair. The Movement Makers Fair will be a place to share and develop skills for resistance, self-determination, inspiration, and healing. Stay tuned for the full schedule of skillshares such as grassroots fundraising, digital security, urban farming, timebanking, and yoga. We’ve seen that movements are built on people power, reconciliation, and love for one’s community.
Click here to RSVP
We need 2-3 members/supporters to table for ONE DC (distribute flyers, sign up interested people, spread the word)
If you want to plan your own skill share or help with the event, email Caitlin at dctimebank@gmail.com.

Other Roles
Phone Banking Coordinators
Learn how to & take the lead:
-Create & split lists in our Nation Builder database
-Draft phone banking scripts
-Contact the phone banking team as needed
-Distribute lists to team, follow up, & help with data entry
Resource Development
-write grant proposals & reports
-plan small fundraisers
Member Development
-conduct 1-on-1s with new members & supporters to get them orientated to ONE DC

If you want to help "carry the water" and build leadership with ONE DC, email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.

ONE DC Week of Action!

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People's Platform General Body Meeting
Thursday, April 27 - 6:00 PM
Petworth Library - 4200 Kansas Ave NW, Basement
April's meeting will center on People's Platform Principle #3: the right to health and wellness for people and the earth. We believe in a system designed to meet our human needs, not to exploit and profit. We will be joined by Empower DC, learn about the systemic issues facing our environment, and prepare for the People's Climate March on April 29th!
#WhyWeMarch: Check out this spoken word poem on environmental justice by Kenya Newsome and Nesha Ruther of Split This Rock 2015 DC Youth Slam
Click here to RSVP

People's Climate March: ONE DC Delegation
Saturday, April 29 - 11:00 AM
Meet Up at 4th St NW & Constitution Ave NW
We invite ALL members & supporters to join ONE DC for the People's Climate March under the banner of the People's Platform. We believe in the right to health and wellness for humans and the earth. We believe in a system designed to meet our human needs, not to exploit and profit. As we organize for racial & economy equity in DC, we demand housing justice, worker justice, and environmental justice! We join the People's Climate March to let the people's voices be heard loud and clear. Now more than ever we must stand together and fight against harmful climate policies! Wear your ONE DC t-shirt if you have one!
Click here to RSVP
Click here to share and invite friends on Facebook


DC On Strike!
Monday, May 1 - 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Lamont Park - Mount Pleasant
We invite you to rally with MLOV and members in a collective demonstration and celebration of unity in Mount Pleasant, after which we will march to the White House to join the regional rally. Let’s collectively demand the kind of city that we want as our home - we will not let the federal government define DC!
Click here to RSVP

May Day
Monday, May 1 - 12:00 - 3:00 PM
Malcolm X Park - 16th St NW
We march: To demand political power for working class; To smash, racism, sexism, and fascism; To stop mass deportations; To end mass incarceration; To oppose imperialist war; To defend the earth and its resources; To fight for health care, education, and living wages for all.
Click here to RSVP

**Please note the ONE DC office will be closed on May 1st for May Day**


Political Education - Thinker, Fighter Mumia Abu Jamal: 'A Life of Revolutionary Purpose'

April 24th was the 63rd birthday of Mumia Abu-Jamal, perhaps the most well known of the political prisoners currently being held in the United States. His lifetime of struggle, beginning with his membership in the Black Panther Party, has been an inspiration for generations of activists, and his case has been taken up by those seeking social justice across the world. But Mumia is far from the only political prisoner being held in US prisons today. On this episode of Loud & Clear, Brian Becker is joined by Ramona Africa, minister of communication for the MOVE organization, by activist and scholar Dr. Anthony Monteiro and by Noelle Hanrahan of Prison Radio.
Click here to listen & learn


Keep Up the Pressure! Pack the Hearing for Brookland Manor

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We had a great turn-out at the hearing last night! The room was packed with residents and supporters for Brookland Manor.
Last night the Commission did not make a ruling. Instead, it pressed Mid-City Financial for answers on how multi-generational families will be housed in the redevelopment, with respect to seniors who wish to remain with their grandchildren and families who would end up broken up, as well as how families can qualify for 3 and 4 BR townhomes (available for homeownership). Chair of the Zoning Commission Anthony Hood also raised concerns about families with individuals with disabilities who should remain together.

This would not have happened without the leadership and resilience of Brookland Manor tenants and ONE DC members, and the widespread community support they have organized and inspired. It is critical that we continue to keep up public pressure on a system that puts the interests of profiteers before those of the people, and one that continues to develop by way of displacement. We expect the DC Zoning Commission to finally make a decision on Monday, May 22, and on that day, once again, we will come out in big numbers to demonstrate our continued solidarity with tenant-led struggles to save affordable and family housing in the District of Columbia, and our commitment to working class black communities under attack by private developers and city officials.

Click here to RSVP for the rally & hearing on May 22nd


Upcoming Events

 

Empower DC: FY 2018 DC Council Budget Hearing for the DC Housing Authority
Thursday, May 4th - Starting at 11:00 AM

Wilson Building - 1350 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Room 120
Barry Farm residents have been fighting for years now to preserve their homes and community. This year we are asking the city council to fund "redevelopment in place" for those who want to stay on the property so that they won't be moved around the city risking their ability to return once the redevelopment is complete.
Register to give testimony or come help pack the room and support those giving testimony! To register contact Oscar Montiel at 202-724-8198 or email omontiel@dccouncil.us
If you need help registering, developing your testimony, or with transportation please contact Daniel del Pielago at 202-234-9119 ext. 104 or daniel@empowerdc.org

Grassroots Workshop on the Comprehensive Plan
Saturday, May 6th - 12:00 - 4:00 PM
Christ United Methodist Church - 900 4th Street SW
Join Empower DC and a broad coalition as we create amendments for DC's Comprehensive Plan. DC's Comprehensive Plan plays a major role in how our city develops. As the city moves to amend the plan this year, we need to be paying attention to what it says about our communities! Join us to learn more, and help shape/push for the inclusion of language that uplifts racial justice and protects communities from the harmful effects of gentrification and displacement! Don’t let developers and their friends control this process!
Click here to RSVP

Think Outside Festival - May 13th
Think Outside with Dance Place and Washington Parks & People in this full day of free outdoor events. Bring the whole family to Marvin Gaye Park & Riverside Center for music, dance and more!
More info at Washington Parks & People

Service to Justice Conference - May 11-14th
Service to Justice (S2J) is a collective of Washington, DC social service organizations, impacted community members, and supportive institutions who recognize that the social service industry perpetuates the current arrangement of power that maintains systemic poverty and structural racism.
Click here to register


Community Announcements

The Defending the Dream Fund - Deadline: May 3rd
In response to these challenging times, the Hill-Snowdon Foundation, in partnership with the General Service Foundation, launched the Defending the Dream Fund. The Defending the Dream Fund will make grants of up to $10,000 to support community organizing.
Click here for more info

Center for Third World Organizing (CTWO) - Community Action Training
Washington, DC – May 19-21
Starting in 1995, our Community Action Trainings (CAT) have provided entry-level organizer training to staff and members of community based organizations, worker center organizations, and other NPOs, as well as individuals through field work, role plays, and discussions. During this high intensity three day training, CAT participants debate approaches to social change, learn how to door-knock and/or other forms of contact work as a tool for recruiting and mobilizing constituents, participate in campaign development and actions, grassroots fundraising techniques, and learn to appreciate the legacy of organizing in communities of color and its relevance in today’s fight for social justice.
Click here for more info & to register

Co-op 101: Introduction to Cooperatives
KDC is offering a FREE Series of online recorded workshops in 2017. Everyone and anyone interested in learning more about co-ops and co-op development is welcome to attend! All interested clients who are not yet incorporated and/or otherwise operating on a cooperative basis will be asked to attend these workshops as a preliminary step to gaining assistance from a member of our team.
RSVP: lori@kdc.coop a minimum of 2 weeks prior to the event or find the event on their Facebook page.


ONE Bit of Good News

Thanks to numerous sponsors, ticket buyers, and individual contributions, we raised over $12,000 at the Pike St. fundraiser! Can you help us reach our goal of $15,000 by making a one-time donation or starting a sustaining donation today?

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Thank you to our sponsors!
Barbra Kavanaugh
Bernard Demczuk
Black Zapatista
Brett Williams
Carl Stokes
Derek Hyra
Edward Jones
Julia Brennan
Kenneth Sebastian Leon
Kirk Gaddy
Live to Give Foundation
Louis Perwien
Maryann Moulden Ferguson
Melissa Jones
Sara Swetzoff
Shelley Jeanne Marcus
Somerset Development Co., LLC

 


 

Do you want to be a writer, editor, or designer for the ONE DC Monthly Voice? Email organizer@onedconline.org

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - March 2017

"Mid-City is destroying families. We can all remember what happened to little Relisha at DC General. We are feeling like throw-away people. You’re throwing us away like we’re trash, like if you don’t see us, that’s the best thing in the world. I really feel that they’re trying to destroy families." -Yvonne Johnson, Brookland Manor resident


"Forewarned is Forearmed" - In the Face of Displacement, We Must Educate Ourselves

jourgette.JPGReflections from an Interview with Ms. Jourgette Reid-Sillah

"We get very comfortable in our lives, and it sometimes takes a tragedy to wake us up," Ms. Jourgette – a survivor of breast cancer and soon-to-be graduate of the University of DC – explains why she is striving to form a tenants association.  She is not waiting for the tragedy of displacement.

"I need to know what's happening. I want to be prepared. I need my community to be prepared," Ms. Jourgette expressed. In Congress Heights, she has heard rumors that the rent in the new developments is well above the current rates in her neighborhood. What will happen to her neighbors who have lived in her building for over 40 years?

Ms. Jourgette recognizes that the displacement happening at Brookland Manor, at Barry Farms, and in too many communities in DC is spreading to Congress Heights. And in response to this displacement, we must educate ourselves. As her mother used to say, "forewarned is forearmed." That's why Ms. Jourgette became a member of ONE DC: she sees the changes coming and is preparing her community to fight for their homes.

ONE DC stands on the principle that there is power in political education. We must understand the city policies, the laws, and the tools available to us, in order to ensure they work for us. For Ms. Jourgette, forming a tenants association in her apartment building in Congress Heights is an important step towards educating her community and preventing the tragedy of displacement.

In Ms. Jourgette's words: "It’s my duty to at least say that whatever happens, l did not let my community not be aware, and not be ready.”

Click here to RSVP for the next People's Platform Meeting Thursday, March 30



Brookland Manor Update

Two urgent housing actions to support the tenant-led struggle at Brookland Manor will take place on April 13th (daytime) and April 24th (evening). Public support for these two actions is critical to continue the momentum and win the fight. A full update on the status of Brookland Manor, with additional details regarding the above-referenced actions will be coming next week. Stay tuned!

If you want to support either of these actions, email Yasmina at ymrabet@onedconline.org


Celebrate Emancipation Day and Support ONE DC's 10th Anniversary Fundraising with a Special Performance of Pike St.    


Friday, April 14th -- Woolly Mammoth Theater Company, 641 D St NW

Schedule

6:45 PM -- Pre-Show Reception with ONE DC Woolly Mammoth Rehearsal Hall. Light refreshments provided
8:00 PM -- Pike St. Performance
From the one-woman dynamo who brought the Obie Award-winning No Child… to Woolly in 2008 comes a rich slice of Puerto Rican immigrant life that “glows with humor” (New York Times). If you’ve ever seen Nilaja Sun’s virtuosic performance style, you’ll want to experience it again…and if you haven’t, you must not miss the chance to be transported to Pike St.

On the Lower East Side, a mother works hard to keep the electricity flowing for her daughter’s respirator while a hurricane looms nearby. As she prepares for disaster, a vibrant host of characters—a decorated war veteran, her ne’er-do-well father, her octogenarian downstairs neighbor—bring new meaning to the phrase “it takes a village.” (85 minutes)

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9:30 PM -- Community Conversation
Led by Woolly and ONE DC, join us for a post-show conversation with fellow audience members about the vital questions raised by Pike St., the personal resonances, and larger societal implications.

Click here to purchase your $50 tickets! Proceeds benefit ONE DC!

A limited number of $25, pay-what-you-can, and free tickets are available. Please call 202-232-2915 or email organizer@onedconline.org for more details.

Please consider sponsoring this event:

  • Carry the Water - $100 - 1 Ticket to Pike St, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt or Black Workers Center T-Shirt, Listing in program & on website
  • Fight for Justice - $500 - 4 tickets to Pike St, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt and Black Workers Center T-Shirt, Listing in program & on website
  • Organize for Equity - $1,000 - 6 tickets to Pike St, ONE DC 10th Anniversary and Black Workers Center T-Shirt, copy of Collective Courage by Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Listing in program & on website
  • Path to Liberation - $5,000 - 10 tickets to Pike St, ONE DC 10th Anniversary and Black Workers Center T-Shirt, copy of Collective Courage by Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Listing in program & on website, Special Feature in upcoming ONE DC newsletter

Click here to become a sponsor


ONE DC Black Workers Center

At our March meeting, we had members write down ideas for projects they would like to see run through the BWC. By the end of our session we came up with three unique action steps:
1) Open mics: In addition to organizing open mic events, this committee will work to secure funding for a sound system, food, and transportation for events.
2) Political education: This committee will work on assembling literature and talking points connecting the BWC to issues facing individuals at work and in the district.
3) Outreach: This committee will focus on creating a mobile "know your rights training" as well as conducting outreach and dispersing literature.
To join, email bwc@onedconline.org

Brunch with a Purpose
Sunday, April 9 - 1:00 - 3:00 PM
Black Workers Center at the United Black Fund - 2500 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE
Are you a software developer? Are you interested in mentoring beginners? Are you ready to invest your skills to ensure greater equity in your field? If so, please join us for a fundraiser brunch.
To RSVP, email email bwc@onedconline.org

Monthly Black Workers Center Meeting w/ Cooperation DC - Coops 101

Thursday, April 20th - 6:00 PM
Black Workers Center - 2500 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE
Cooperation DC invites you to the Black Workers Center to learn about worker cooperatives, the emerging East of the River Childcare Cooperative, and to share your own coop ideas. Cooperation DC’s mission is to expand dignified employment opportunities in low-income communities of color through the development of worker cooperatives, businesses owned and managed democratically by their employees. Food and childcare will be provided at the workshop. For more info, email Cooperation DC coordinator Nia Nyamweya at nnyamweya@onedconline.org.
Click here to RSVP

Black Workers Center Chorus
The BWC Chorus will not rehearse next Tuesday, April 4. Alternative rehearsals will take place at Franklin Square on Sundays at 11AM. For more details and to join the chorus, contact Luci Murphy at 202-234-8840.


We Demand Full Funding for the NEAR Act

The NEAR Act stands for the Neighborhood Engagement Achieves Results Act of 2016. The law, which passed the D.C. Council unanimously, was the product of a District-wide conversation around policing and public safety. The NEAR Act sought to establish a framework to ensure residents safety while also addressing police abuses.

The Act aims to reset the conversation on policing to recognize that public safety can’t be produced through mass incarceration or racial profiling. It lays out the frameworks for establishing community-led violence prevention efforts. These programs have extraordinarily good results. Cities as diverse as Chicago, New York, Baltimore, and Richmond, CA, have seen between 40% and 70% reductions in shootings, sometimes in just one year. They work by empowering respected community members to act as conflict mediators, combining that with particularly tailored access to social programs to help people change their circumstances.

Click here to sign the petition

As Stop Police Terror Project DC continues the campaign to fully fund the NEAR Act, there are some important events in the upcoming days, and one important request we have for you. This Saturday April 1st there will be a mass rally demanding, among other things, that Mayor Bowser fully fund the NEAR Act. It will gather at 1pm at Congress Heights Metro and march to the 7th District Police Station.

Saturday April 8th at 12 Noon, the Stop Police Terror Project-DC will be having a General Body Meeting. This will be an opportunity to get updated on the campaign to Fully Fund the NEAR Act and how to get further involved. Also, we will be discussing some other important criminal justice issues in the District of Columbia and our plans concerning them. This event will take place at 617 Florida Ave. NW.


May Day!

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Click here to RSVP for May Day 2017

May Day Planning Meeting
Friday, March 31st - 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
New Community Church - 614 S St NW
The International Workers of the World (IWW) & ONE DC are inviting labor and community groups to participate in an international day of action for worker solidarity. We intend to celebrate our past victories as well as find strength to continue the struggle for ending war, racism, while bringing justice to working families everywhere. We look to showcase local and international struggles for economic and social justice by taking our collective voices to the streets and marching through Washington, DC. 
Committees:

1) Logistics: Preparing space at Malcolm X Park and coordinating the march including speakers for the march, tabling, permits, and organizing multilingual spaces.
2) Media / Press / Outreach: Messaging and sharing of information associated with May Day.
3) Arts: Producing signs, banners, puppets, flags, and other visuals for the march.

Click here to register for a committee

DC On Strike!
On the morning of May 1, MLOV invites all DC movement organizations with an active campaign to hold an action with the words “DC ON STRIKE” visible along with their main demand. We envision May 1st being a day where local demands to protect communities under attack can coalesce and multiply the campaign’s visibility. At noon, we invite you to rally with MLOV and our members in a collective demonstration and celebration of unity in Mount Pleasant, after which we will march to the White House to join the regional strike.
Click here to RSVP and for more info


Upcoming Events & Actions

DC Fair Elections Campaign Launch
Saturday, April 1 - 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Douglass Hall, Metropolitan AME Church - 1518 M St NW
Many DC residents feel big donors and developers have a greater voice in DC politics than we do, the DC Fair Elections Coalition is working to change that. But we need your help - Join us Saturday, April 1 to hear about how the DC Fair Elections Campaign can put more power back into the hands of everyday District residents and native Washingtonians and be part of passing the bill this year!
Click here to RSVP

Ghosts Of Seattle Past - Author Talk with Jaimee Garbacik
Thursday, April 20 - 7:00 - 8:30 PM

The Potter's House - 1658 Columbia Rd NW
Join us in welcoming author & activist Jaimee Garbacik on Thursday, April 20 at 7pm. Jaimee will present her newest work Ghosts of Seattle Past: An Anthology of Lost Seattle Places, a collection of interviews, essays, comix and art commemorating places in Seattle lost to development, gentrification, and neglect.Jaimee will be joined by artist Josh Powell, and the pair will show how the project grew from a community-sourced atlas of memories into a time capsule of a changing city. They will present Josh’s beautiful, hand-drawn maps, as well as stories of lost Seattle places, and then open the floor to attendees to share memories of places they have lost in their own city, and to pin them on a digital map of Washington D.C. Come join the discussion!
Click here to RSVP

People's Climate March

Saturday, April 29 - Washington DC

On Saturday, April 29th in Washington DC, we will come together for one massive march to bring our demands to the streets. We will march for our families. We will march for our air, our water, and our land. We will march for clean energy jobs and climate justice. We will march for our communities and the people we love. And we will be louder and stronger than ever before.
Click here to RSVP

Service to Justice Conference
Thursday, May 11th through Sunday, May 14th
Service to Justice (S2J) is a collective of Washington, DC social service organizations, impacted community members, and supportive institutions who recognize that the social service industry perpetuates the current arrangement of power that maintains systemic poverty and structural racism.
Click here to register


ONE DC Political Education Calendar

IWW Organizer Training: "Building the Committee"
Saturday, April 22 - 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM and Sunday, April 23 - 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
ONE DC Home Office - 614 S St NW
Please join the IWW for two days of organizing training at the end of April. The 'Organizer Training 101: Building & Maintaining The Committee' is one of the most comprehensive trainings of its kind aimed towards rank and file workers, union members, and worker organizers. The training is a great opportunity to inspire workers and provide the the basic tools needed to organize so we can live and practice the idea of "every worker a leader." Simply put, the training is about giving workers the confidence they need to begin organizing with their fellow workers. The IWW are asking people to register by April 10th, 2017 to insure that they can provide sufficient training materials, breakfast & lunch for everyone. Registration is FREE but a suggested donation of $10 is appreciated. Please plan to attend the entire two days of training! All workers are welcome.
Click here to register


Community Announcements

ONE DC has on-going need for volunteers in the following areas:

  • childcare at meetings & events
  • providing transportation for other members to/from meetings & events
  • interpretation/translation (most urgent: ASL, Spanish, Amharic)

Click here to sign up for any of these volunteer roles

Center for Third World Organizing - The Movement Activist Apprenticeship Program

Established in 1985, MAAP brings activists together for eight weeks to learn the art and science of organizing through in-the-field training and skill development with a labor or community organization. MAAP interns receive a weekly stipend, housing and local transportation during their field placement. MAAP is for people of color at least 18 years old, with an interest in pursuing a career as a community or labor organizer. The deadline for this application is May 20th, 2017. To apply for this year’s MAAP cycle, please click HERE. For questions contact Avery Bizzell, Program Coordinator by email avery@ctwo.org or by phone at (646) 926.1287

Girls Rock! DC - We Rock! Camp
Girls Rock! DC is excited to announce that applications for their 3rd annual We Rock! Camp are now open! The camp is for women, trans, and gender non-conforming adults age 19 and up. At the camp you'll have the opportunity to learn an instrument, form a band or DJ crew, collaborate to write an original musical expression, and perform for a live audience all in one weekend. No musical experience necessary to be a camper at We Rock! Camp. The deadline for applications is Friday, April 7th. If you're interested in attending or volunteering please click HERE.


ONE Bit of Good News

Thank you to The Keep for choosing ONE DC as beneficiary from the DC Blues+Fusion Global House Party & Racial Justice Fundraiser!
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Do you want to be a writer, editor, or designer for the ONE DC Monthly Voice? Email organizer@onedconline.org

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - February 2017

America is Black. It has always been. It is a man twirling at 3AM under colorful lights, sweaty and in love with his boyfriend. It thrives with disabilities. It is migrant. It is a tongue that unapologetically only speaks Spanish. It is a self-regulated womb. It is Native. It has been here before any White foot touched its soil. It is traumatized. It is hungry. It is a woman. It has always been.

It translates for its parents. It transcends borders. It transcends binaries. It is dodging violence on the streets. From men. From the police. It wears a hoodie. It wears a hijab. It has kinky hair that smells of coconut oil. It is trans. It’s a kiki with friends and nights slept on a park bench.
It’s a fist in the air and a fiery demand for justice. It has always been. It prays in a New York City mosque. It prays in a South Carolina church. It is my Black mama and my Persian, immigrant daddy. These are not exceptions. These are not Others. These are not descriptions in contrast to what is normal.
This is it.
It is here. It has been here.

AND IT IS NOT GOING ANYWHERE.


Say No! to Displacement

On February 23, ONE DC members stood with Brookland Manor residents in their struggle against displacement at the hands of Mid-City Financial and the District of Columbia. We were joined, in force, by SURJ-DC, IWW DC, Metro DC DSA, the Black Workers Center Chorus, Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, Housing Advocacy Team, GW Young Progressives Demanding Action, Black Lives Matter DC, API Resistance, DC Jobs with Justice, Fair Budget Coalition, DC for Reasonable Development, Americans for Transit, Georgetown Solidarity Committee, Justice First, DC Right to Housing Initiative, MLOV, the Washington Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights & Urban Affairs, and many more partners and supporters. Simply put, our presence was undeniable. Before we could even begin, security mandated we move a paltry distance from where we had set up to the red brick sidewalk behind us (even though much of our comrades were already occupying it). Separated by the empty space of the courtyard nothing was more clear: The power of the people terrifies the capitalist class.

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Click here to view more photos. Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie

Black Workers members Luci Murphy, Ma Krstn, and Eric Sheptock opened the rally by leading the group in song. Brookland Manor residents Yvonne Johnson, Dorothy Davis, Neeka Sullivan, Cheryl Brunson, Valarie Scott, and Serita El-Amin shared stories of their vibrant community. They were joined by spoken word poet Nkechi Feaster and activist-organizers Linda Leaks, Eugene Puryear, and Yasmina Mrabet. "Brookland Manor is a place where families become families," Yvonne Johnson explained, "It's our home." Ms. Dorothy Davis reminisced about raising her children in Brookland Manor and how she now has the joy of helping raise her grandchildren there as well. Transforming a space in which one merely dwells into a community that one lives takes decades of support and compassion; a labor of love that goes beyond the pull of self-interest. Ms. Cheryl Brunson humbly recounted how, during a tumultuous time in her life, it was her neighbors in Brookland Manor who served as a vital support system for her and her family.

In addition, residents provided a deft critique of the repressive measures taken by Mid-City Financial in the struggle for Brookland Manor. For those unaware, Mid-City Financial has fenced off the courtyard, blocking an essential element in maintaining their communal life. "We can't even stand outside and watch our kids," Neeka Sullivan explained. Similarly, Mid-City Financial has hired new security guards whose only purpose is to harass residents and produce an endless proliferation of infractions. These tactics, as well as the overall struggle, are dramatically affecting the quality of life of the residents of Brookland Manor. Painfully, Yvonne Johnson observed that in her 20 years there she hasn’t come across this level of depression. Children are weighed down by the possibility that one day they may no longer have a home to come back to.

Despite these realities the residents of Brookland Manor are undeterred. "We haven't seen a gathering like this in a long time," Linda Leaks shouted, passionate yet focused, "We are not going to move and we are going to win." Indeed, the line for those who showed up to support the Brookland Manor residents nearly wrapped around the building and we easily filled the overflow room.

Once inside, Mid-City Financial undertook what appeared to be a rather bizarre testimony. Over an hour long, they fixated on minute details concerning the types of shrubbery they wanted to plant and the hue and crispness of their brick selection. Mid-City Financial is just as comfortable prioritizing aesthetics over the concerns of their residents as they are putting their profits before the community. Here, we are reminded of Walter Benjamin's warning about the dangers inherent in introducing "aesthetics into political life" and the displacement it brings (See the epilogue in Benjamin's The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction). Yet, despite the absurd performance, the tactic was deliberate. The zoning commission proceeding only allows the cross examiner to question the Defendant based on the testimony given. Presumably, if the testimony is filled with vapid details and dead-ends the cross examiner will be barred from initiating a meaningful line of questioning.

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"The essence of the police," writes Jacques Ranciere, "lies in a certain way of dividing up the sensible." That is, it is a power that determines what will be seen and heard while simultaneously determining what will be excluded from being seen and heard (See theses 7 & 8 in Ranciere's Ten Theses on Politics). During the cross examination, tenant legal counsel Will Merrifield insisted that Mid-City Financial clarify the difference in available multi-family units between the current Brookland Manor housing complex and Mid-City Financial's proposed redevelopment. The struggle for Brookland Manor is precisely over the question of displacement and, as Will made abundantly clear, Mid-City Financial's redevelopment plan logically can not house the same number of families currently living in Brookland Manor.

However, given the triviality of Mid-City Financial's testimony, Chair Anthony Hood attempted to censure Will's line of questioning as irrelevant. That is, Chair Hood classified Will's speech, which places the question of displacement front and center, as that which does not have the right to be heard. In other words, the Brookland Manor resident’s concern about displacement is not relevant to the overall hearing process; their concern could only be heard in a certain context, i.e. the minutes to the November hearing. By attempting to exclude Will's line of questioning, the Zoning Commission Board was de facto impeding the Brookland Manor resident's ability to fully secure their right to return. Regardless, legal counsel Will Merrifield succeeded in forcing the Zoning Commission Board to yield to his line of questioning.

Towards the end of the night the Brookland Manor resident’s were given an opportunity to testify and they did not mince words. Ms. Dorthy Davis cut to the heart of the dissymmetry between the two parties. “We don’t want to fight,” she implored, “We want to work with them but Mid-City Financial is putting profit over our families.” Indignant, Miss Elliott commented on Mid-City Financial’s frivolous testimony, “You can bring up all the bricks you want but if you aren't bringing up lives you're not bringing up community.”

We packed the hearing with so many people ready to testify in opposition to Mid-City Financial's plans, the Zoning Commission needed to schedule a second hearing date. ONE DC members and residents at Brookland Manor request your support at the next stage zoning commission hearing on Thursday, March 16. Momentum is on our side and now is the time to stand together and say No! to displacement. At the rally before the hearing, Linda Leaks emphasized that we need to “know their terms and use it against them and make them use your terms. You have to learn what your power is and speak the same language as they do in order to tell them to get out.” "A concept is a brick," writes social theorist Brian Massumi, "It can be used to build the courthouse of reason. Or it can be thrown through the window." The Brookland Manor residents have the right to stay put. Mid-City Financial will fall.
Click here to RSVP
Click here for more info & updates on Brookland Manor


Building Black Worker Power in DC

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Click here to view more photos from the evening. Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie

Community residents from Anacostia and across the District gathered last Friday, February 24th for an evening of music, arts, food, and programming to celebrate the launch of the ONE DC Black Workers Center (BWC), housed at the United Black Fund at 2500 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE. The BWC is a worker-led space that builds racial and economic justice through popular education, direct action and worker-owned alternatives.

The program included a musical performance by members of the Black Workers Center Chorus, an interactive reading by storyteller, oral historian, and author Candace Wolf, and spoken word by Joseph Green of Split this Rock. Visual art was created and donated for the evening by Chris Bantum and Jeremy Darby. Rakhel's Live Cuisine provided gourmet vegan food and fresh juice.

The Black Workers Center has been in development since 2014, with regular monthly community meetings held at the United Black Fund building for the past two years. The idea for the project emerged out of community listening sessions following the Washington Marriott Marquis Hotel Jobs Training Program. Troubled by the continued failure of DC's workforce development system to address unemployment, DC workers and residents began to envision an alternative space to address the intersections of race and work in DC. In 2015, emerging Black Workers Center members traveled on a series of Coop Learning Journeys to Baltimore, New York, and Philadelphia to learn about incubating worker-owned cooperatives as an alternative to low-wage work. Along with ONE DC’s Cooperation DC project, the Black Workers Center will serve as both a political education and incubation space for worker cooperatives. The space will also serve as a creative hub, where BWC members can time bank volunteer hours in exchange for use of equipment and materials. BWC members are also developing an apprenticeship coding program.

Click here to sign up with the Black Workers Center

The Black Workers Center Chorus that performed at the launch practices every Tuesday evening at the BWC. To join the chorus and for more info, contact Luci Murphy at 202-234-8840.


2017 Annual Membership Meeting

Saturday, March 25 - 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Thurgood Marshall Center - 1816 12th St. NW     

What is the people's vision for 2017 and beyond? What is ONE DC's financial standing? How did we win in 2016? How can you as a member get involved? Join us to find out! All are welcome, but only members who are up to date on their annual dues will be eligible to vote in elections for new members of ONE DC's Shared Leadership Team. Membership dues and donations are used to build a people's movement funded by the people. Join ONE DC and support us in building power with long time DC residents to organize for an equitable city. Click here to pay your 2017 membership dues and build a stronger ONE DC!

Food will be served - All ages welcome - Please let us know if you need transportation or childcare.
Click here to RSVP


Cooperation DC's Vision for 2017

Our vision is to establish an ecosystem to launch and support worker-owned businesses in DC in the following ways:

  • Launch NW Childcare Cooperative: In 2017, we will launch a childcare women-owned business consisting of 15 Latina immigrant worker-owners. A grant award provided by the Meyer Foundation will enable the formulation of the business plan and launch.
  • Organize an African American Women-led Childcare cooperative East of the River: The efforts and lessons learned while organizing the NW childcare cooperative in 2016 will serve as the foundation to create the support and infrastructure needed to identify and develop the women that will form the worker-owned childcare cooperative business East of the River.
  • DSLBD Cooperative Convenings: Participating in stakeholder meetings will prove instrumental to creating a cooperative ecosystem by sharing current needs, mapping the current coop infrastructure, setting priorities, and addressing long-term and short-term needs.
  • Issuing the first Working World Peer Network loan to a DC local cooperative: we will build local and regional capacity through our participation in the Working World Peer Network.
  • Fundraising: In order to realize these goals we will need to fund raise $300,000 in calendar year 2017. If you'd like to support the (re)emerging cooperative movement in DC, please consider making a tax-deductible donation. No amount is too big or too small!

Click here for more info on Cooperation DC


"Smart" Growthers Attack McMillan Park Court Victory

By: Chris Otten, co-facilitator, DC for Reasonable Development

The McMillan court victory is a huge step forward in the legal and planning realms of the District for the longtime, existing DC families and peoples and communities that we want to preserve and protect. The McMillan Court affirmed very clearly that when large luxury development projects with lots of housing are proposed to be constructed in already established DC communities, DC planning officials must consider and act to mitigate the subsequent land value destabilization and resultant increase in displacement pressures.

Click here to continue reading


ONE Right to Wellness - Making the Just City


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We're pleased to update members on our research grant through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's "Culture of Health" initiative, one of 15 projects selected throughout the country. Created in collaboration with Mindy Fullilove, MD and Derek Hyra, PhD (The New School and American University, respectively), our work focuses on gentrification & displacement in two communities, and the community-level initiatives being implemented to improve wellness among long-time residents facing displacement. Dominic Moulden, Resource Organizer at ONE DC, is the third member of this team.

In its 10-year plus history of organizing around the right to housing for DC residents, ONE DC has gained invaluable experience with one of the communities of interest – Shaw, in Washington, DC. ONE DC is uniquely prepared to work with those in the sister community of Orange, NJ who are facing the beginning stages of gentrification as the two participate in a bi-directional transfer of knowledge regarding affordable housing, health in communities, and interactions across economic, racial, and socioeconomic differences. As the project progresses, we are looking for ONE DC supporters to get involved:

1)  Two DC residents to be hired as paid research associates. Qualifications:

  • Community stakeholder
  • Well-versed in the history, geography, politics and culture of the community
  • Keen interest in learning about the community's story
  • Willing to observe meetings and take careful notes
  • Willing to carry out interviews
  • Willing to travel for research meetings and participate in regular conference calls
  • Willing to participate in a project training
  • Full job description to come!

2) Long-time & new members and residents living in Shaw to participate in interviews, focus groups, and other campaign activities

For more information on how to get involved with the Making the Just City project, please email Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.


Monthly People's Platform General Body Meeting

Thursday, March 30 - 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
New Community Church - 614 S St NW

The People’s Platform is a movement of low-income and working class DC residents of color and people who share our values and vision. We seek to organize, educate, fight for and win truly affordable housing, sustaining work, and wellness for all in DC. Our monthly People's Platform general body is a space where we work towards our goals by prioritizing political education and leadership development in our work; centering the leadership of working class black women; being funded by our base; always seeking to build a deeper analysis and assessing our work; building alternative institutions; learning from past movement's successes and limitations; championing non-reformist reforms; and always seeking to be a part of a broader movement that is multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-gender, and multi-class. This month's topic will be People's Platform Principle #4, a right to health for humans and the earth.
Click here to RSVP


Upcoming Events & Actions

Healing Ourselves, Healing Our World for People of Color
Friday, March 3 at 5:00 PM to Sunday, March 5 at 3:00 PM
Trinitarians Retreat Center - 8400 Park Heights, Ave, Baltimore, MD
Join Baltimore and Beyond: Mindfulness Community (BBMC) for a mindfulness retreat in the first weekend of March. For the BBMC, "Mindfulness is a path of practice...which helps us to become aware of the moment to moment activities of our minds, our speech and our action. As we become more aware of the activities of our mind, we remember certain principles we want to abide by, virtuous principles of kindness, love, compassion, equanimity." Kaira Jewel Lingo and Marisela Gomez will facilitate the retreat.
Click here to register for the retreat
Click here for info about BBMC

Candace Wolf: Shifting the Universe
Thursday, March 9 - 7:30 PM
Red Emma's Coffeehouse Bookstore - 30 W North Ave, Baltimore
Come join us at Red Emma's for a night of story recitations, call & response, participatory readings, and community dialogue with storyteller, oral historian, and author Candace Wolf.
Click here for more info and to RSVP

May Day!
Planning Meeting - Friday, March 10th - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S ST NW
The International Workers of the World (IWW) & ONE DC are inviting labor and community groups to participate in an international day of action for worker solidarity. We intend to celebrate our past victories as well as find strength to continue the struggle for ending war, racism, while bringing justice to working families everywhere. We look to showcase local and international struggles for economic and social justice by taking our collective voices to the streets and marching through Washington, DC. The May Day 2017 Planning Committee is asking for local and international organizations to bring their struggle and message to this year’s day of international working class solidarity in a variety of ways. To get involved, join us at the planning meeting March 10th or contact dcmayday2016@gmail.com or call/text Jason R. at 443-254-8943.
Click here to RSVP for May Day 2017
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People's Climate March
Saturday, April 29 - Washington DC
On Saturday, April 29th in Washington DC, we will come together for one massive march to bring our demands to the streets. We will march for our families. We will march for our air, our water, and our land. We will march for clean energy jobs and climate justice. We will march for our communities and the people we love. And we will be louder and stronger than ever before.
Click here to RSVP


Wow! Before & After Photos from the Black Workers Center

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Thank you to all our members, staff, volunteers, & supporters who helped get the space cleaned, renovated, & ready for community use!

Our next goal is to raise $20,000 for studio equipment & materials to realize our vision of the BWC as a creative arts space. Click here to contribute or start a monthly sustaining donation to support the ONE DC Black Workers Center


How can participating in cooperative economics chisel away the power of capitalism?

In this podcast, Upstream Conversation spoke with Professor Jessica Gordon Nembhard, author of Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice (and ONE DC Shared Leadership Team member) about the history of solidarity economics--particularly worker cooperatives--within the African American community:

We travel in time from the era of slavery, through to Jim Crow segregation, share-cropping, and finally within the modern day prison industrial complex, looking at how cooperatives have formed in prisons in Puerto Rico. What can we learn for the United States, where African American's comprise one-third of the prison population? We also spoke about the intersection of capitalism and racism. How do capitalism and racism support each other? And how can the act of participating in cooperative economics can chisel away the power of capitalism?

Click here to listen to the podcast


Do you want to be a writer, editor, or designer for the ONE DC Monthly Voice? Email organizer@onedconline.org

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On February 23, ONE DC members stood with Brookland Manor residents in their struggle against displacement at the hands of Mid-City Financial and the District of Columbia. We were joined, in force, by SURJ-DC, IWW DC, Metro DC DSA, the Black Workers Center Chorus, Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, Housing Advocacy Team, GW Young Progressives Demanding Action, Black Lives Matter DC, API Resistance, DC Jobs with Justice, Fair Budget Coalition, DC for Reasonable Development, Americans for Transit, Georgetown Solidarity Committee, Justice First, DC Right to Housing Initiative, MLOV, the Washington Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights & Urban Affairs, and many more partners and supporters. Simply put, our presence was undeniable. Before we could even begin, security mandated we move a paltry distance from where we had set up to the red brick sidewalk behind us (even though much of our comrades were already occupying it). Separated by the empty space of the courtyard nothing was more clear: The power of the people terrifies the capitalist class.

We packed the hearing with so many people ready to testify in opposition to Mid-City Financial's plans, the Zoning Commission needed to schedule a second hearing date. ONE DC members and residents at Brookland Manor request your support at the next stage zoning commission hearing on Thursday, March 16. Momentum is on our side and now is the time to stand together and say No! to displacement. At the rally before the hearing, Linda Leaks emphasized that we need to “know their terms and use it against them and make them use your terms. You have to learn what your power is and speak the same language as they do in order to tell them to get out.” "A concept is a brick," writes social theorist Brian Massumi, "It can be used to build the courthouse of reason. Or it can be thrown through the window." The Brookland Manor residents have the right to stay put. Mid-City Financial will fall.

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - January 2017

"Ultimately a genuine leader is not a searcher of consensus but a molder of consensus. On some positions cowardice asks the question, is it safe? Expediency asks the question, is it politic? Vanity asks the question, is it popular? But conscience asks the question, is it right? And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular but he must take it because conscience tells him it is right." -Martin Luther King, Jr.


"Movements do not come to us from heaven, fully formed and organized. They are built by actual people, with all their political questions, weaknesses and strengths." -Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor


What Is To Be Done?

“The tradition of the oppressed teaches us that the “state of emergency” in which we live is not the exception but the rule.” –Walter Benjamin Theses on the Philosophy of History, Thesis VIII

     Donald Trump is the leader of the free world. In his first week as president he has signed a disheartening number of executive orders: Reviving the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines, banning refuges and residents from seven Muslim nations, the authorization of a U.S.-Mexico border wall, and banning federal funds to international groups that perform abortions or lobby to legalize or promote abortions.[1] The left, galvanized by an unmistakably white supremacist regime, have overwhelmingly refused the Trump administration’s sovereignty. There have been marches, mass protests, and, in a few instances, the destruction of corporate property.

     However, there are two broad tendencies on the left that, if unresolved, threaten to stifle the revolutionary potential of the moment. One desires a world free from the systems of oppression that constitute the American political system. The other merely wants to return to a less tumultuous time. It is this second tendency that refuses to acknowledge the violent core of American politics. They refuse to acknowledge the rising tide of fascism beyond the figure of Donald Trump.
     
     Leon Trotsky, in opposition to the Stalinists and their theory of ‘social fascism’, insisted on fascism’s specific political role: “The historical function of fascism is to smash the working class, destroy its organizations, and stifle political liberties.”[2] Trotsky’s analysis, however, situates fascism within an economic crisis rather than a general function of State repression. It is precisely during a crisis that the democratic process breaks down and capitalism is at its most vulnerable. Here the material conditions of the masses are a breeding ground for malcontent but also a germinating class-consciousness. In response, capitalism organizes fascist cells to dismantle anti-capitalist resistance. Thus, fascism appears during periods of “deep social crisis” by default.[3]
     
     Today, economic crises are bound to the material conditions of the middle class. The financial crisis of 2008 devastated the wealth of middle class Americans (albeit disproportionately amongst African Americans).[4] Now, income inequality has widened to such a degree that the middle class “may no longer be the economic majority in the U.S.”[5] Of those who voted, Trump won the majority of both white college graduates and white non-college graduates.[6] Other demographics reveal that Trump’s largest support came from those with salaries ranging from $50,000 – $99,000 as well as those living in the suburbs, small cities, and rural areas.[7] If fascism is capitalism in decay then it is also as much a crisis of whiteness. Yet everyone knows that Hilary Clinton won the popular vote (despite voter turnout plummeting to a 20-year low).[8] The issue is that the Electoral College, by its very nature, tends towards reifying white supremacy.
     
     We cannot emphasize enough the importance of the Alt-right aligning their movement with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign or the significance of Trump naming Stephen K. Bannon, former executive chair of Breitbart News, as his chief strategist and senior counselor. However, it’s a mystification to claim that Trump’s election is normalizing white supremacy. The truth is it was here long before January 20th. The Clinton administration built the carceral state; Barack Obama expanded George W. Bush’s clandestine drone war while also authorizing over 2.4 million deportations as President.[9] Trump’s policies and appointees are intensifications, not aberrations, of American politics.
     
     The ‘Great American Experiment’ has always been an experiment of white supremacy. Our nation grew by enslaving generations while thieving untold wealth from their labor. Modern medicine owes its status as a science to the ghastly tampering of black bodies.[10] We recoil in horror at the eugenics programs of the 19th and 20th centuries yet most forget that America forcibly sterilized Black and Indian women up through the 1970s.[11] Still, we risk erasing the struggles of marginalized people when we merely equate fascism with white supremacy. Trotsky’s analysis, as it was made from his historical position, fails only insofar as we maintain that fascism manifests during a period of crisis rather than as a phase in a larger coherent system of violence and oppression.
     
     From within San Quentin State Prison, George Jackson argued that fascism’s most advanced form was here in America.[12] For George, fascism went through three phases: 1) Out of power 2) In power but not secure 3) In power and securely so.[13] With each phase come varying modes of political violence from Mussolini’s Black Shirts to America’s expansive policing and prison apparatuses. However, binding the fascist mode of violence is its intolerance of any “valid revolutionary activity.”[14] In the late 60s, the FBI used COIINTELPRO to wage war against the Black Panther Party. Today, the State mobilized the National Guard and local police precincts to brutally repress water protectors in North Dakota. What we are beginning to experience is fascism’s shift from the exterior of the American political system to engaging the entire social body.
     
     So what is to be done? It is not enough to only engage in critique or to be anti-capitalist, anti-fascist, anti-racist, or anti-Trump. Negative concepts have never been strong enough to hold together revolutionary movements. The general strike, mass protest, and other forms of direct action are all useful tactics for waging revolution. However, their use is secondary to the community and values that drive them. We must refuse the call for a return to American politics and the white subjectivity it privileges. We cannot content ourselves with only pushing fascism back underground, back to only policing low-income communities, back to only terrorizing our brothers and sisters in the Middle East and beyond. We must begin to practice a politics of solidarity, inclusion, and radical egalitarianism. We must center the struggles of marginalized people and listen to their voices. We must prioritize political education. We must build alternative institutions. We must remember, “The essence of politics is dissensus.”[15] Our enemies will try to convince us that “we are insufficient, scarce, waiting in pockets of resistance, in stairwells, in alleys, in vain” but the demonstrations this past week have proven the contrary: “We’re already here, moving.”[16]

[1] http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/01/24/list-trumps-executive-orders.html

[2] https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/works/1944/1944-fas.htm See: The Collapse of the Bourgeois Democracy.

[3] https://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/works/1944/1944-fas.htm See: The Fascist Danger Looms in Germany.

[4] http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/06/black-recession-housing-race/396725/

[5] http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2016/05/11/americas-shrinking-middle-class-a-close-look-at-changes-within-metropolitan-areas/

[6] http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/11/09/behind-trumps-victory-divisions-by-race-gender-education/

[7] https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/11/08/us/politics/election-exit-polls.html?_r=0

[8] http://www.cnn.com/2016/11/11/politics/popular-vote-turnout-2016/

[9] http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2016/oct/21/donald-trump/trump-right-deportation-numbers-wrong-talks-about-/

[10] http://thenewinquiry.com/essays/the-case-for-medical-reparations/

[11] See Reproductive Rights from Angela Davis’s Women, Race, & Class.

[12] Jackson, George. Blood in My Eye. New York: Random House, 1972. Print.

[13] Blood in My Eye. Page 123.

[14] Blood in My Eye. Page 118.

[15] Ranciere, Jacques, and Steve Corcoran. Dissensus: On Politics and Aesthetics. London: Continuum, 2010. Page 38. Print.

[16] Harney, Stefano, and Fred Moten. The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study. Wivenhoe: Minor Compositions, 2013. Page 19. Print.


Say NO to Displacement - Rally & Zoning Hearing for Brookland Manor!

Thursday, February 23 - Rally at 5:00 PM
Hearing starts at 6:00 PM & will last for several hours

Zoning Commission - 441 4th St NW #200
     
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ONE DC members and residents at Brookland Manor request your support at the upcoming second stage zoning commission hearing on Thursday, February 23. At this hearing, the tenants and their legal team will be arguing for the inclusion of robust affordable housing, including the retention of large bedrooms, so that no resident is displaced from their existing community. We request that you both submit written testimony, and if possible, join us in person to provide testimony publicly in support of Brookland Manor tenants fighting to save their home. We encourage members who attend the monthly People's Platform meeting to join us at the rally & hearing under principle #1 of the People's Platform: "Housing for every person. Housing is a human right, not an opportunity to exploit & profit." Brookland Manor residents are saying NO! to displacement. Join us!

Member Support Needed!

  • RSVP and share with your networks
  • Sign up to testify
  • Phone banking to members
  • Canvassing in Ward 5
  • Social media (live-tweeting during rally & hearing)
  • Transportation of members & supplies
  • Sign-making
  • Outreach to other orgs, coalitions, partners & allies

To volunteer for any of these roles, email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org and Yasmina at ymrabet@onedconline.org

Brookland Manor Campaign Legal Update
The last hearing was held on November 21, 2016 when the federal district court for the District of Columbia denied Mid-City Financial Corporation's motion to dismiss the Brookland Manor case yet also denied the resident families' and ONE DC's preliminary injunction, which would have ceased any efforts to relocate or evict tenants on the basis of the redevelopment (Click here for a brief summary of that hearing, courtesy of the Washington Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights & Urban Affairs).

Click here to RSVP


Black Workers Center Open House!

Friday, February 24 - 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
     
Come through and support the ONE DC Black Workers Center (BWC) by checking out our newly renovated office space in Anacostia and find out how we're building power in 2017! The BWC is a member-led space that builds racial and economic justice through popular education, direct action and worker-owned alternatives. We will also be unveiling the new Black Workers Center logo!
Click here to RSVP


*NEW* ONE DC Political Education Calendar

The political education calendar is a new feature of our monthly newsletter that will highlight upcoming community learning events in the DC area. We recommend ONE DC members come together at these events as part of a commitment to ongoing political education, study, & reflection. In the words of Paolo Freire, "For apart from inquiry, apart from the praxis, individuals cannot be truly human. Knowledge emerges only through invention and re-invention, through the restless, impatient, continuing, hopeful inquiry human beings pursue in the world, with the world, and with each other.”

The Power of Cooperative Ownership in the Black Community
Monday, February 13 - 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
National Press Club, 529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor
Cooperatives continue to play a significant role in social and economic development in the Black community. From economic independence and desegregated housing, to small farmer empowerment and food security, cooperatives are an integral part of the Black experience that has often been silenced. Accordingly, the panel will explore the potential of cooperatives to drive economic growth and social progress in the United States and abroad. The panel will be moderated by Ellis Carr and feature Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Cornelius Blanding, LaKeisha Wolf, and Alex Serrano as speakers. 
Click here to RSVP

Race, Class, and Struggle Then and Now: Lessons from the League of Revolutionary Black Workers
Tuesday, February 14 - 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM
Social Work Auditorium - Howard University, 601 Howard Pl NW (at the corner of Howard Pl & Sixth St, NW - enter from Sixth St)
Howard University is excited to announce that Jerome Scott from the League of Revolutionary Black Workers will be visiting the campus to screen video from the oral history project on the LRBW in the Detroit auto plants from 1968 to 1970. The forum will focus on Black workers and their struggles in the factories, the community, and schools as part of the movement upsurge in the 1960s. It will lift up lessons learned for today’s generation of scholar activists and movement actors rooted in the experiences of League members, many of who who are engaged in movement struggle today. A critical lesson to be discussed is that "it's easy to be a revolutionary in revolutionary times, but it takes theory to be a revolutionary in ebb times."
Click here to RSVP


Upcoming Events & Actions

Black Lives Matter General Assembly Meeting
Thursday, February 2 - 6:00 - 9:00 PM
Covenant Baptist United Church of Christ - 3845 S Capitol St SW
The Movement for Black Lives Steering Committee is going to be hosting our first General Assembly of the year. It will focus around the organizing and advocacy around the NEAR Act and building a sustained joint campaign for transformative criminal justice reform. This general assembly will feature a popular education piece on the NEAR Act and updates from core groups on how to get involved.
Click here to RSVP

DC Fair Elections Grassroots Meeting
Saturday, February 4 - 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Anacostia Library - 1800 Good Hope Rd SE
More than half a million of us were out in the streets last weekend, making a stand for women’s rights, our climate, black lives, immigrants’ rights, LGBTQ equality, our democracy, and the myriad of intersecting issues for which we will all need to fight for the next four years. One of the key lessons from the Women’s March this weekend was that we can’t just all go home and pat ourselves on the back for a job well done. It’s up to us to become leaders in our own communities on the issues we care about: to take action and to keep pushing our elected officials to do what is right.
Click here to RSVP

Stop the Cuts, Save WMATA - Americans for Transit
Monday, February 6 - 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Resources for the Future - 1616 P St Conference Room B
Next Monday, Americans for Transit will hold a meeting discussing how to save our metro system. Our system is tipping towards the "Public Transit Death Spiral" and WMATA's only response has been to propose service cuts and fare hikes. Maintaining an efficient and reliable public transportation is foundational for a just and equitable city.
Click here to RSVP    

Solidarity Squad Kickoff and Training - DC Jobs with Justice
Thursday, February 9 - 6:00 - 8:00 PM
Florida Avenue Baptist Church basement - 623 Florida Ave NW
The new federal government has begun its assault on our communities. We need tight-knit, organized groups of people to resist the right-wing's agenda, to protect workers' rights, and to defend our neighbors. That's exactly what we seek to build with the Solidarity Squad. Training will include: community building, training on racial bias, local DC organizing, and opportunities for more training.
Click here to RSVP

Rooting DC 2017
Saturday, February 18 - 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wilson High School - 3950 Chesapeake St NW
Rooting DC is an all-day gardening forum that aims to provide education about urban food production and consumption, to cultivate health and preserve the environment.
Click here to RSVP

The Black Public Health Student Network: Communities of Color Health Conference

Friday, February 24 - 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Milken Institute School of Public Health - 950 New Hampshire Avenue NW
The Black Public Health Student Network will be holding their annual conference on issues related to minority health and community wellness in relation to a view to educate future public health professionals and community members on critical issues and barriers pertaining to health in minority communities. We are proud to announce that Dominic Moulden will be speaking on the Housing and Community Development panel. This year's theme is, "Health Care is a Human Right: Intersections of Racial Inequity and Health Attainment."
Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News - A Word from a Member
By Julia Thome

appreciation.jpgEnergized! That’s how I feel going into 2017 as a member of ONE DC. I am a new member of the organization, first participating in a march for housing rights in Congress Heights earlier in the year, then going on a ONE DC tour of the Shaw neighborhood. On December 3, I attended the ONE DC Member Appreciation celebration at the RISE Demonstration Center in SE DC. I was welcomed by staff and long-time members, and also met several new members, like myself.

Each person I met, and those that spoke during the event, had an inspiring story to tell that connected them to the work of ONE DC. For example, I was moved by the passion and energy of Kristi Matthews, a leader with the Brookland Manor campaign. She had attended a training by ONE DC 6 or 7 years ago, and became involved again through her work as a Kressley Fellow at the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless. She has a deep commitment to the issues, as she is involved in other community organizations dealing with homelessness and poverty, and is completing studies to become a mental health counselor. After speaking with Kristi in the line for food (food catered by Organic Soul Live was amazing, by the way), I was thrilled to see Elijah win a member award.

Among the many other stories told at the celebration, I was also excited to learn about the Norwood Childcare Cooperative, the food sovereignty cooperative under development, and the recent victories of the Congress Heights residents.

The inspired lyrics and beats of Son of Nun were the perfect accompaniment to the energy of the event, as members got up on their feet to sing along. While speakers at the event conveyed an underlying recognition of the difficult road ahead for housing and economic justice, I couldn’t help but feeling energized by the momentum of ONE DC and hopeful about what can be accomplished in 2017.

Click here to pay your 2017 membership dues


Community Announcements

DC Greens - Become a Community Advocate
In the name of building community power that addresses change at the city level and creates a more just food system, DC Greens is hiring 6 Community Advocates. The positions are part-time, 18 hours/month for 5 months at $20/hour. We plan to hire in February. Job Description and application information here!

Protect DC's Budget - Sign the Fair Budget Coalition's petition

4th Annual DC Black History Calendar

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Do you want to be a writer, editor, or designer for the ONE DC Monthly Voice? Email organizer@onedconline.org

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - December 2016

Thank you to all who have donated this month and throughout 2016! With the individual donations & foundation support received since our last appeal, we are 90% of the way to our goal of raising $50,000 before the end of 2016. We're also closer than ever to our goal of 100 sustaining donors who contribute monthly. Please consider making a donation of any size to sustain our work going into 2017.

For those of you who have been us from the beginning, from before the emergence of ONE DC, the below words may sound familiar. In honor of the closing of 10th Anniversary year, we share with you excerpts from one of ONE DC's very first appeal letters, because our vision then reflects our vision now -- a truly equitable DC.

Imagine Justice

Imagine a city where long-time residents are not pushed out because of rising rents and property taxes. A DC that truly recognized that residents’ contributions to the city are not merely monetary. A place where people, and not profit, have the loudest voice. A District with living-wage jobs—and the emphasis is on living, not struggling to survive. And no, this isn’t only a whimsical Washington, DC of your nighttime dreams. At ONE DC, we believe in dreaming with our eyes wide open.

“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them,” Thoreau once said. With your help, we can build the foundations under our “castles in the air.” We are building the future we want to live in, brick by brick.

 

Be a visionary.

A Japanese proverb reminds us that “vision without action is a daydream and action without vision is a nightmare.” ONE DC is dedicated to vision in action, and your support makes you an integral member of our team of visionaries. Grassroots support like yours makes a difference. Your cash, check or credit card contribution tells the world that the movement for equitable development is truly a popular movement. And we can’t imagine a movement without you!

For years communities across the District have seen public divestment and neglect, only to see investment once wealthier residents begin moving in. Your investment in ONE DC asserts that all communities in DC deserve equity, and helps reverse the disturbing trend of socioeconomic disparities. Because people like you can create a city in which racial and economic injustice is just…unimaginable.

We understand that some individuals who feel the most inspired by our mission are unable to give accordingly. But really, no amount is too small. We mean it. Donate by clicking here or by mailing to ONE DC - PO Box 26049, Washington, DC 20001

peace,

Dominic T. Moulden
Resource Organizer

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ONE DC Monthly Voice - November 2016

"The Fourth Way will harness the power and strategic location of indigenous people, exploiting pressure points beyond the workplace to oppose and transform unjust, unequal, and undemocratic systems." -Julian Brave Noisecat


Mapping Our Radical Atlas: Introducing the 2015 People's Progress Report

Washington, DC is one of the most rapidly gentrifying cities in the country. But this is only the latest flare of violent, economically driven displacement in the area. The Piscataway, the Anacostank (who resided in the area now known as Anacostia), the Pamunkey, the Mattapanient, the Nangemeick, and the Tauxehent were all brutally forced from the region. And more: the names are not complete, the stories are not complete, and the maps are not complete.

So it feels all the more apt to transform the People’s Progress Report into a gesture of counter-mapping—to fill in maps and to fill in the gaps. Counter-mapping, also known as counter-hegemonic cartography, radical cartography, and mapping-back, originated as an indigenous resistance practice to contest colonialist claims to land. It’s about story and sovereignty. It’s about spatial justice. No map is neutral. And this radical atlas, far from exhaustive, does not claim to be. We’re unapologetic about mapping toward a more equitable District and mapping back against the “official” maps that erase and displace longtime Black residents of DC and all people who are “mapped out” of DC’s local history.

In 2015 we went on learning journeys, self-study tours, and trainings to build our knowledge and to chart out new plans and strategies for subversive cartography­—mapping back to reinvigorate ourselves and mapping forward to reclaim our city. In order to reclaim DC, we must acknowledge that we are losing Black homelands and Black landscapes. The whitewashing of DC is real and it is formidable. That’s why our organizing work—through the People’s Platform, Black Workers Center, and Right to Housing—is key to building a powerful base of longtime DC residents, to naming the terrain of renewed power and resistance.

And yes, we are hopeful. ONE DC supporters are showing up in our organizing geography: Justice First, API Resistance, Black Lives Matter DC, BYP100, DC Showing Up for Racial Justice, and the Neighborhood Solidarity Network. So let’s “map in” our struggle for freedom! As freedom fighter and former political prisoner Angela Y. Davis wrote in her book, Freedom Is A Constant Struggle, “Our histories never unfold in isolation. We have to talk about systemic change. We can’t be content with individual actions.” Everyday we organize we add a page to the DC radical atlas. Join this movement of cartographers of organized resistance!

Click here to download & study the 2015 People's Progress Report: "Radical Atlas"

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We Dance About Life

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Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie, Esmeralda Huerta

Click here to view more photos from our latest fundraising event -- a special ONE DC showing of Dance Place's What's Going On? Life, Love, & Social Justice. Thanks to your support, we are closer to our goal of raising $1.3 million over 2 years to support the opening of the Black Workers Center and #Another10Years of resident-led organizing for racial & economic equity in DC! Click here to donate.

Thank you again to our sponsors and to all those who bought tickets, donated, & volunteered!


We Appreciate You.

Member Appreciation is our end-of-year event to celebrate the wins, actions, and accomplishments of our members, donors, supporters, volunteers, but you don't have to be a member to attend! This is the perfect event to learn more about ONE DC and how you can get involved, while enjoying good food, music, & company. All ages are welcome.
Click here to RSVP

Delicious food served by Organic Soul Live! (Contact Elijah Joy at theelijahjoy@gmail.com for more info)

Featuring a performance by Baltimore-based Revolutionary Hip Hop Artist Son of Nun
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Transportation Info:
Metro- Green Line to Congress Heights Metro Station
Bus- A2, A6, A7, A8, A4, W2, W3 (Stop: MLK Ave. SE)
Parking available onsite. Click here for driving directions.

Volunteer roles needed:

  • Arrive at 2:15 PM to help set up
  • Childcare
  • Work with caterer to monitor & stock food/beverages
  • Stay until 7:00 PM to help clean & pack up

We need help offsetting the costs of space, food, supplies & honorariums for our favorite end-of-the-year event celebrating our members, donors, volunteers, & supporters.

Click here to sponsor Member Appreciation

Click here to start your monthly sustaining donation of $10, $20, or $50 a month

Click here to pay your annual membership dues.
If you have questions about the status of your dues, email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.


Housing is a Human Right

By Mary Walrath, StreetSense

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Is housing a universal human right? This is the question that community members gathered to discuss in a town-hall style meeting at the Church of the Epiphany on October 28. The Focus Attitude and Commitment to Excellence (FACE) group of Street Sense vendors, along with the People for Fairness Coalition (PFFC), convened to form a panel and deliberate, with an audience of housed and unhoused individuals, on issues of housing, poverty and homelessness.

Robert Warren, the executive director of the People for Fairness Coalition, Sheila White, member of FACE and PFFC, Dominic Moulden of ONE DC, William Merrifield of Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless, Schyla Pondexter-Moore from Empower DC and Jane Zara, a public interest lawyer, came together on a panel moderated by Patty Mullahy Fugere of the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless.

Click here to read the full article on StreetSense

Click here to view photos from the event


Nathan Cummings Foundation Fellowship

The Nathan Cummings Foundation Fellowship supports visionary leaders by giving them boundless space to turn an inspired idea in the field of social justice into a world-changing reality. The Fellowship awards three individuals up to $150,000 each to pursue an innovative project that seeks to address a challenge related to climate change or inequality – or within the intersection of these two major issues. An NCF Fellowship must align with at least one of the Foundation’s core focus areas: Inclusive Clean Economy; Racial and Economic Justice; Corporate and Political Accountability; and Voice, Creativity and Culture. The Nathan Cummings Foundation is currently accepting applications for the 2017 Fellowship until December 12.

Click here for more info and to apply

 


Upcoming Events

DC Labor Chorus presents An Evening of Favorite and Sacred Songs
Saturday, December 3rd - 7:30 PM
ATU Tommy Douglas Conference Center - 10000 New Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring MD
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Fund the Resistance! End of Year Party for Many Languages, One Voice
Saturday, December 3rd - 6:30 PM - 10:30 PM
Boss Bistro & Lounge - 2463 18th St NW
Join MLOV for a review of our year's work and organizing highlights, hear from our powerful immigrant members, recommit yourselves to being warriors, bask in each other's fierce presence, and of course...enjoy great music and food!
Click here to RSVP & for more info

Monthly Black Workers Center Meeting

Thursday, December 15 - 6:00 PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
ONE DC's Black Workers Center (BWC), is a member-led space that builds racial and economic justice through popular education, direct action and worker-owned alternatives.
Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News

Thank you to Black Benefactors for hosting a house party fundraiser & community dialogue in honor of ONE DC's 10th Anniversary! We appreciate your support and the opportunity to engage in conversation & reflection on organizing for racial & economic justice in DC.

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To host your own house party fundraiser for ONE DC, contact Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org or call 202.232.2915.


Shopping Online in December?

Register with ONE DC at smile.amazon.com/ch/87-0766022 and Amazon donates to ONE DC every time you shop.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - October 2016

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"Movements should operate under the assumption of equality of sacrifice. Working in solidarity means doing something that's uncomfortable.” -Eugene Puryear, founder of Justice First


The State of Black Labour Organizing in DC: Past, Present and Future

On Tuesday, October 25, ONE DC, along with Resource Generation, hosted an interactive panel discussion about the history and current state of black labour in DC as well as the role of intersectionality in solidarity organizing. Sitting on the panel were Iimay Ho, the Associate Director at Resource Generation and serving on the board of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice; Kimberly Mitchell, a long time union member and labor activist in the fashion, beauty, and retail industry as well as Vice President of the UFCW Board of Directors; and Eugene Puryear, founder of the anti-gentrification group Justice FirstJobs Not Jails Coalition, Stop Police Terror Project-D.C. and author of the book Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America.

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 From Left: Kimberly Mitchell, Iimay Ho, Eugene Puryear


During the discussion, the panel named two forces impeding a robust and inclusionary coalition of black labour organization: 1) A shift away from labour organizing towards non-profit paternalism and 2) an absence of worker solidarity.

Many of the organizations built to work on behalf of black workers and communities are run by non-representational groups. It's the "professionalization of organizing," Eugene remarked. Non-profits embody an institutional hierarchy whereby the needs of the community are defined by an organization and not the people. "Black workers have become the object of organizing, not the subject," Eugene quickly added. Career activism has a tendency to silence the voice of the community in favor of its own programs and political allegiances, especially when confronted with the need for funding.

This tendency speaks to the reality of organizing within conditions set by Neoliberal Capitalism. Organizations need money to function and that money must come from somewhere. Yet, Resource Generation has worked tirelessly to reduce the limitations funding an organization normally necessitates. "We have the flexibility to give to organizations, which frees you to support this or that," Iimay deftly explained, "There's no hoop jumping." rg_event2.JPGOne of Resource Generation's core values is believing that "social justice movements need to be led by communities most directly impacted by injustice." Resource Generation aims to reverse the status quo of funding: They subordinate their privilege and wealth to the voice of the community.

Still, even if an answer to the question of funding were found we must still confront the stark lack of worker solidarity and organization. Lamenting, Kimberly spoke a hard truth, "Mothers and daughters have always been organizing the community, church, schools, etc but they've become complacent. I have to remind them that they are needed." A little later she discusses the disparity between the older and newer generation of workers: "I see workers that have worked for forty plus years being disrespected and told 'We don't need you.' What we have now is an assembly line of workers who are unorganized and untrained who are lucky to be there past the ninety day probation period. Its very important we teach the younger generation to let them know that this is not okay or normal." Similarly, Iimay vigilantly highlighted the need for an intersectional approach to organizing: "The legal/illegal immigration status is a strategy for keeping a mass of workers that are vulnerable. Trans folk have some of the highest homeless and unemployed numbers, which are even more when you're black and trans. Queer youth can be cut off from their family and resources."

In the end, the panel left the audience with some advice for moving forward. "Accountability is a key issue. The city will pass anything that sounds progressive but will include either infinite loopholes or make it impossible to enforce." Kimberly was in agreement: "DC is dressed up with nowhere to go." Kimberly also was adamant about opposing gentrification: "What we need to organize around is housing. We are being displaced. This is everybody's fight." Earlier in the discussion, Iimay stood by countering the effects of gentrification: "I don't believe DC should be built on my needs and my consumption." By the end of the night she returned to this sentiment: "The powers that be center the needs of wealthy people and not long-term residents. We need to change the game. We need to focus systemically."

If you would like to find out more about Resource Generation click here. Click here to support ONE DC.


Please join us in Standing with #NoDAPL

In a display of absolute barbarism, militarized police, in conjunction with the National Guard, brutally repressed the peaceful water protectors at Standing Rock in North Dakota. The fascists subjected the Sioux Nation, along with fellow demonstrators, to beatings, tear gas, sound cannons, and dog attacks. There are also reports of inhumane treatment where protesters were thrown into dog kennels after being arrested.

The Sioux Nation are protesting the North Dakota Access Pipeline on grounds of both treaty and human rights violations. First, the pipeline would cut straight through Sioux territory violating the treaty of Fort Laramie drawn in 1868. Second, the pipeline would devastate the local environment and wildlife including our most precious resource: water.

These events must be taken in the context of America's long history of brutalizing and betraying indigenous peoples. This tradition traces all the way back to America's seventh President Andrew Jackson and beyond. The United States has endlessly violated treaties with indigenous peoples often redrawing them under the threat of violence.

From gentrification in the District to violating the land rights of the Sioux Nation we see the same pattern repeat. Power knows but two modes of response: indifference to the cries for justice and violence for those who resist.

We ask you to stand with the Sioux Nation and with all peoples displaced and dispossessed in the name of profit and Empire!

Begin by learning more and visiting the Sacred Stone Camp website.
Sign a petition calling for an end to the construction of the North Dakota Access Pipeline.
Stay updated by following NoDAPL on twitter.


 

ONE DC Member Spotlight: Luci Murphy

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Over the weekend we sat down with Luci Murphy as a part of our Member Spotlight feature. We met at Lamont Park in Mt. Pleasant, which was soon to be the site of the annual Dia De Los Muertos or Day of the Dead celebration with Luci slated to perform later that day. Together we discussed her thoughts on ONE DC, politics, and the unique importance of music.

ONE DC: Before we get started, I see everyone is setting up for an event. What is it? Are you performing today?
Luci: Mmhmm! Its the Day of the Dead. The tradition is that people build an altar and bring photographs of their deceased loved ones, put them on the alter, and remember them. It's a day of remembrance. We'll have music and poetry. We usually do a little parade a few blocks through the neighborhood to remind everybody.

ONE DC: You have a rich history with ONE DC stretching back 10 years. Could you briefly state what attracted you to the organization in the beginning and what motivates you to still be an active member?
Luci: The issues. The issues of housing and jobs. These are issues that we still have not resolved. There's a lot of dislocation. I remember when my aunt lived in a substantial house in the 60s and the price on it was 25,000. The same house is probably three quarters of a million now. How to you do that? People's salaries aren't changing. What is this?

ONE DC: What is it about ONE DC's approach to organizing that you like?
Luci: The emphasis on co-ops. Studying co-ops and preparing people to build co-ops! 

ONE DC: Last month you performed at the Renter's Day of Action. What inspired your performance? What did you want people to take away?
Luci: We have a lot of vacant buildings in Washington, DC and then we have our homeless. Why can't we get these two together?

ONE DC: The Black Worker's Center Chorus is in its early stages of gestation. Whats the difference between it and the DC Labour Chorus?
Luci: The Black Worker's Center Chorus will mostly be from Washington, DC. It's going to be the people who are dealing with these issues first hand. I would really like to see a good representation of wards six, seven, & eight, which is where the BWC is located.

ONE DC: When do you think it'll begin meeting?
Luci: It'll be after December 3rd.

ONE DC: And if someone is interested in joining?
Luci: Call me! People are scared to call me! They know I'm going to give them something to do!

ONE DC: As a performer, music and art are an essential dynamic in your activism. Who's work, either artistic or political, inspires you?
Luci: I grew up with some very activist congregations. St. Steven and the Incarnations and because I was a member of St. Steven I met a woman, an older lady from Mississippi who embodied the tradition. She played three chords on the guitar but she played them in a hell of a way! She got people to sing along with her. She had something called Mother Scott and her children and I was one of her children. The pastor would take us to city council hearings and she would sing to make a point and of course that would make the news. Not everyone comes to a city council hearing with a guitar prepared to sing!

ONE DC: There's something special about music, especially call-and-response, that can bring people together. What do you find unique about it?
Luci: It works! 

ONE DC: Music and Art have always played a fundamental role in the struggle for justice, emancipation, and equality. Outside of the feeling of solidarity when performing music, how else do you see music contributing to the struggle for justice?
Luci: We didn't have the SNCC freedom singers here but we had their recordings. We were able to use them.

ONE DC: American University was hosting a panel and an art gallery to honor the work of Emory Douglas. They were discussing the power and importance of his work and the way he could communicate very complicated messages in a very simple way thereby reaching a wide variety of people. Do you feel that music shares this quality?
Luci: Absolutely! I think music is actually more social because more people can participate. The creation of visual art is a very solitary process whereas music is a social process.

ONE DC: You mentioned there's more participation in music not only in a call-and-response but people are also free to riff on music anyway they want to at any time they want to through rhythm, clapping, vocalization, improvisation, etc.
Luci: Fredrick Douglas KirkPatrick said that it used to be that anybody could sing a song or pray a prayer but now its gotten so complicated. We only have specialists doing these things and we're lost in this specialization.

ONE DC: This kinda goes back to politics where the only people to be respected are the specialists.
Luci: Our Chorus is singing a song called 'You can dance, you can sing' taken from a proverb from Zimbabwe, which has been translated as 'If you can walk, you can dance; if you can talk, you can sing' but thats really a message for us in the United States. What the actual song says is if you can dance, dance, if you can sing, sing! You know, like do it! Everyone in Zimbabwe can dance and sing and nobody's embarrassed. That is part of what you do as a member of a community whereas here if you don't move just right you may get criticized and if you're self-conscious you may decide not to participate. 

ONE DC: Similarly, there are now specific places to do it. The community aspect is being pushed out. The only way to access it is by joining a club that you have to pay for or renting a space to play in.
Luci: And I see some of the singing and music playing has become commercialized: "If you pay such and such an amount you can play as a part of this jazz group we are starting."

ONE DC: You should be able to just pick up and play. That's just what you do.
Luci: But somebody has just rented some space and has decided that they're going to get some people to pay for their time. That shouldn't be the only way that culture survives.

ONE DC: All across the country people are facing dispossession and displacement at the hands of the ruling class for profit. From the District to North Dakota neoliberal capitalism is violating people's right to housing and land. Even more, resistance is often met with brutal state violence and repression. How do you think people should go about building solidarity with one another, especially when you are economically contributing to those forces, willingly or unwillingly?
Luci: We need to study history because in order to know who we are we need to know where we come from. This country is built on great injustice and cruelty for which it's never apologized. It's never apologized to the indigenous people for all the murder and theft and never apologized to the African people for all the centuries of unpaid labor. We need to study who we are, where we come from, and then form that we will know what we have to do, but it starts with an apology. 

ONE DC: How do you get an apology without allowing Empire to bury these issues as something that's happened only 'in the past'?
Luci: We have to build consciousness and right now folks are very unconscious. They are having poisonous television, poisonous food, poisonous water, and poisonous air thrown at them all the time. Well, how can they get conscious? We've got to build a movement. A movement that has to educate, energize, and encourage folks.

To contact Luci about the Black Workers Center Chorus you can find her Facebook page here or call her at 202.234.8840.

Sponsor ONE DC's Presentation of Dance Place's What's Going On: Life, Love, & Social Justice

For one night only on Friday, November 18th, ONE DC will be hosting Dance Place’s very special Marvin Gaye-inspired performance: “What’s Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice.” In Dance Place’s first full-length production, taking inspiration from 1971’s inimitable What’s Going On, Marvin Gaye’s insights into life, love and social justice are given fresh perspectives with new choreography by Vincent E. Thomas, Ralph Glenmore and Sylvia Soumah. The evening-length work features Modern, Jazz and West African dance and seeks to spark conversations to ignite change in each community it touches.

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Dance Place has generously dedicated the performance of “What’s Going On” on November 18th to be a night of fundraising for ONE DC. The evening will begin with a reception at 6pm, followed by the performance, lasting until 9pm.

By sponsoring this event, you will contribute to our efforts to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund #Another10Years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC. Securing sponsors will also enable us to offer more free/reduced price tickets to this event for our long-time members. Click here to become a What's Going On? sponsor!

To make your sponsorship donation offline, please mail check to ONE DC, PO Box 26049, Washington, DC, 20001, or contact Dominic at 202-232-2915, dmoulden@onedconline.org.

You can also buy your ticket to the event here. Free or reduced price tickets are available!

We are looking for volunteers to both prepare for and help run the event!
Volunteer roles include:

  • 6 Ushers - 4 volunteers to usher people in and out of the theater. 2 volunteers to assist stage manager Hannah with various tasks
  • 4 volunteers to arrive at 5:00pm to both set up food and clean up afterwards
  • 2 volunteers to monitor the food once it's been set up
  • 4 volunteers to help clean up after the event
  • 2 volunteers to help serve beverages
Similarly, ONE DC is also looking for volunteers to phone bank the weeks of 10/31 and 11/7. Phone banking will include spreading the word about the event as well as recruiting sponsors. If you're interested in volunteering for the event please email Claire at ccook@onedconline.org, or call 202.232.2915.

ONE DC Welcomes New Staff!

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Pictured right: Yasmina Mrabet

Yasmina Mrabet is a Moroccan-American organizer and conflict resolution practitioner. She grew up in the Middle East, North Africa, and the United States in a cross-cultural, interfaith household. Yasmina is Community Organizer for ONE DC's People's Platform, and has been a member of ONE DC for three years. She joins ONE DC with experience as an organizer in the Labor Movement, the Anti-War Movement, and the Movement for Black Lives. Most recently, as a union organizer with UFCW Local 400, Yasmina worked to develop Project Retail, a growing group of retail and food workers fighting for living wages, fair working conditions, and access to public transportation in and around Washington, D.C. She remains a member of Stop Police Terror Project DC's core organizing group, and is President of the Board of Directors of NVMS, a conflict resolution organization based in Fairfax, VA. Yasmina is passionate about organizing to expose, oppose, and resist institutionalized racism and the systematic targeting of black and brown communities through gentrification, mass incarceration, and war. Yasmina holds a BA from the University of Virginia in Middle Eastern Studies and a MS from George Mason University in Conflict Analysis and Resolution.


Organizing & Coalition Building Updates

Congress Heights
On October 27, DC attorney General Karl Racine filed a lawsuit against Sanford Capital LLC, citing 129 code violations. This is the second lawsuit this year filed by the District against Sanford Capital (The first was on behalf of the Congress Heights residents while this lawsuit is on behalf of the residents of Terrace Manor Apartments). Click here and here to read more.

Brookland Manor

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Click here to sign and show your support for Brookland Manor residents.

Black Workers Center
Members from the Black Workers Center met on October 20 at our regular monthly meeting to continue discussing the Five Faces of Oppression. In our discussion of Marginalization, the act of relegating or confining a group of people to a lower social standing or outer limit or edge of society, questions were raised concerning the disparity between gentrification in the District and the struggle for economic and racial equality. More specifically, how to organize in the face of the displacing and deteriorating effects of gentrification. Along these lines, members also discussed the Black Workers Center's definition of Blackness. By the end, the definition was left open and subject to develop as we continue to push our conversations each month.

Back in September, members of the Black Workers Center and Cooperation DC sat down with the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. DMPED is beginning to develop a new economic strategy and is interested in cooperative development as part of a broader economic strategy for DC. To get involved with Cooperation DC, click here. Similarly, DMPED is hosting a panel discussion on the effects of sharing and gig economies on the District. Click here for more information.

Click here to read the feature of the ONE DC Black Workers Center in Yes! Magazine!


Upcoming Events

4th Annual Coop Clinic - Co-op Management
Saturday, November 12 - 9 AM - 12:30 PM
3047 15th St NW - Next Step Charter School
The next Coop Clinic will be focused on strategies for better Co-op Management. The trainings will be provided by organizations involved in supporting housing cooperatives in the DC area.
Click here for more info and to RSVP

DC Ideas Fest
DC IdeasFest opens on November 17, and what will follow are four days of high-profile keynotes, ideas events and workshops to showcase solutions and innovations from every quadrant of Washington and harness all of our diversity, creativity and energy to build a stronger city, specifically targeting opportunities in the areas of education, equity, and innovation. Signature events will include idea slams, participatory theater, “What Works” workshops featuring cross-experiential groups of thinkers tackling problems such as affordable housing, and a series of “Solve This” challenges to encourage grassroots solutions to intractable problems such as closing off the school-to-prison pipeline.
Click here for more info

Admin & Organizational Management Committee
Meeting
Tuesday, November 29 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following: website, member database, social media, e-newsletter & communication, strategic planning, member events & more.
Click here to RSVP

Member Appreciation Celebration
Saturday, December 3 - 3:00 PM to 7:00 PM
RISE Demonstration Center - 2730 Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE
The Member Appreciation Celebration is our end-of-year event to celebrate the wins, actions, and accomplishments of our members, donors, supporters, and volunteers. All ages are welcome as well as long-time members and new supporters.
Click here to RSVP

National Conference on Gentrification and the Destruction of Black Washington DC
Saturday & Sunday, November 5 & 6 - 9:00 AM & 10:00 AM
The conference will feature panels exploring, among other topics, gentrification in DC, the state of public education & the school-to-prison pipeline in DC, and policing, mass incarceration, & the enforcing of unfair sentencing laws. The conference will also include workshops on the criminal justice system, affordable housing, police brutality, political organizing, and school privatization.
Click here for more info & to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News

For the last 10 years, ONE DC has been fighting for freedom and justice. Help us celebrate our anniversary by sharing your stories of the struggle! We would love to hear your memories and reflections on your experiences with ONE DC. Tell us about a particularly memorable campaign or event that you were part of, or share your thoughts on where we’ve been and where we’re going. All you have to do is email Dominic at dmoulden@onedconline.org and we’ll set up a time for you to be informally interviewed.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - September 2016

"We’ve got to come together as a community and fight for what we want. Our voices have to be heard. But in numbers.” -Adriann Borum, Brookland Manor Resident & ONE DC Member


Sponsor ONE DC's Presentation of Dance Place's What's Going On: Life, Love, & Social Justice

For one night only on Friday, November 18th, ONE DC will be hosting Dance Place’s very special Marvin Gaye-inspired performance: “What’s Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice.” In Dance Place’s first full-length production, taking inspiration from 1971’s inimitable What’s Going On, Marvin Gaye’s insights into life, love and social justice are given fresh perspectives with new choreography by Vincent E. Thomas, Ralph Glenmore and Sylvia Soumah. The evening-length work features Modern, Jazz and West African dance and seeks to spark conversations to ignite change in each community it touches.

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Dance Place has generously dedicated the performance of “What’s Going On” on November 18th to be a night of fundraising for ONE DC. The evening will begin with a reception at 6pm, followed by the performance, lasting until 9pm.

By sponsoring this event, you will contribute to our efforts to raise over $1 million to fund the opening of ONE DC Black Workers Center, as well as to fund #Another10Years of organizing for our human rights to housing, income, & wellness in DC. Securing sponsors will also enable us to offer free/reduced price tickets to this event for our long-time members.

  • Fight for Justice - $500 – Two tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt.
  • Organize for Equity - $1,000 – Four tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt, ​copy of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Struggle by Barbara Ransby & ​Freedom is a Constant Struggle by ​Angela Y. Davis.
  • Path to Liberation - $2,000 - $5,000 – Ten tickets to tickets to special showing of the Dance Place's "What's Going On? Life, Love & Social Justice" Marvin Gaye-inspired performance and reception on November 18, 2016, ONE DC 10th Anniversary T-Shirt, copy of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Struggle by Barbara Ransby & ​Freedom is a Constant Struggle, Opportunity to speak on-stage during special performance of “What’s Going on?”

Click here to become a What's Going On? sponsor!

To make your sponsorship donation offline, please mail check to ONE DC, PO Box 26049, Washington, DC, 20001, or contact Dominic at 202-232-2915, dmoulden@onedconline.org.

You can also buy your ticket to the event here


ONE DC Welcomes New Staff!

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From Left: Nawal Rajeh, Delonte Wilkins & daughter Taylor, Madeline Hernandez, Nia Nyamweya

Delonte (Tae) Wilkins was raised in the Green Leaf community of SW as a child, then later moved to the Eckington area of NE, attending schools such as Amidon Elementary, Jefferson Junior High, then Dunbar Senior High, where he graduated. Like many youth in his era, Tae experienced violence from all angles in his life-- from street violence, poor education, to police profiling-- all forms of violence leading up to a hopeless community. Struggling to stay positive in a community of hopelessness, Tae experienced severe anxiety, accompanied with stress and depression, which led to poor choices which later landed him in prison. While in prison, Tae educated himself. He read history, law, political theory, and books on various organized rebellions. After educating himself, he learned that his condition was a result of a systematic agenda that purposely created the hardships he has endured . Shortly after his release, Tae began to organize with ONE DC after hearing about the organization from a friend in the neighborhood. Hearing the group discuss the “People's Platform,” recognizing human rights as the foundation in which a nation should be built on, sharing the same vision, Tae immediately stayed on board, motivated to help in any way possible. Tae is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: dwilkins@onedconline.org

Nawal Rajeh is the daughter of Lebanese immigrants who fled the country’s 16-year civil war and settled in Youngstown, Ohio. It was during her youth that she learned firsthand of the hardships that accompanied injustice and ignited her passion for organizing. Before coming to DC, Nawal was a community organizer in Baltimore, where she worked on joblessness and youth programs. She co-founded By Peaceful Means, which continues to run two summer programs for children in East Baltimore. Upon moving to DC eight years ago, Nawal began facilitating youth programs focusing on peace and conflict resolution in DC Public Schools. She has been a member of ONE DC for three years and is excited to continue learning and building on the legacy of resistance and alternative vision for the city that ONE DC and its members have been fighting to preserve and create. Nawal is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: nrajeh@onedconline.org

Nia Nyamweya
is a Kenyan-American, intersectional feminist organizer and activist. She is from Silver Spring, MD and received her BA from Towson University in Women’s and Gender Studies with a minor in French. Nia began organizing after college in St. Louis, Missouri when she worked with youth in the Normandy District to end the school-to-prison pipeline. Ending environmental racism and healing oppression of black women is her passion. She works part-time with the National Organization for Women (NOW) and Institute for Policy Studies (IPS). Nia happily joins ONE DC to create spaces that center black women's voices and create alternative economies. In her free time, she practices yoga and dances salsa. Nia is a part-time apprentice organizer focusing on the Black Workers Center.
Contact: nnyamweya@onedconline.org

Madeline Hernandez was born in Washington, DC on September 1, 1998 to Salvadoran parents. Her parents immigrated to the United States a couple years before she was born, escaping from the civil unrest El Salvador was undergoing in the hopes of providing better for themselves and their future. Madeline was raised uptown in the Brightwood/ Fort Totten area where she attended the city’s public schools, such as Rudolph Elementary (before it became Latin Public Charter) and Truesdell Education Campus. She is a 2016 graduate from School Without Walls Senior High School, and it was here there that her passion for political activism and critical thought began to blossom. Her perspective as a Latina of low socioeconomic status was enough for her to have something to say in classrooms that were dominated by kids in various positions of privilege. She owes the development of her consciousness to being raised during the birth of Black Lives Matter in such a politically active city and having teachers in high school that openly discussed Feminist Theories. After graduating high school, she decided to take gap year to pursue experience in the field she plans on entering, (a double major in Women’s Studies and Social Services or Latino Affairs) and that is how she stumbled upon this organization.  Her attraction to ONE DC came from hearing one keyword: radical. For years, Madeline used “Radical” as her social media platform because she described her thought process as one that got to the root of issues by constantly asking why. Ultimately, coming to the conclusion that the institutions put in place are to blame for all of society's issues, especially when it comes to race, a conclusion that ONE DC reached years ago in its beginnings. She’s determined to channel her passion into making change within her community. Madeline is a part-time intern organizer.

We also welcome back returning interns Vincent DeLaurentis (Georgetown), Noah Wexler (George Washington), K Me (Georgetown), Citlalli Velasquez (Georgetown), and welcome Samantha Lemieux (George Washington), Jennifer Hosler (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), and Gregory Lee (Montgomery College) as new fall interns & fellows!


Turning the Light of Truth: #RentersDayofAction at Congress Heights

On Thursday, September 22nd, ONE DC, Justice First, tenants of Congress Heights, Brookland Manor, Museum Square, and our members and supporters rallied in solidarity with renters in DC and nationwide for the Renters Day of Action. Across the country, in more than 50 cities, renters rose up in powerful demonstrations of the power of everyday people standing up for racial, economic & social justice. Renters are making four major demands:
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In DC, residents living at a Congress Heights property are making another demand. Department of Housing and Community Development must take control of 3200 13th Street SE from the current owners to prevent known slum landlords and developers from gaining site control to move forward with their development plan in which they seek to displace Congress Heights tenants. Affected residents at Congress Heights and the larger neighborhood must be given priority as to determining alternative plans to create the affordable housing originally intended for the site in a manner that is beneficial to and determined by the community. Additionally, DHCD must take action to recuperate the missing $1 million from the owners of 3200, and commit to reinvesting it back into the development of 3200 to create much needed income-based affordable housing on the property as was originally intended.
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Workers with Project Retail also shared their experience with displacement in DC & request support for their petition for fair access to public transportation.

Photo Credit: O. Michael Leslie

Organizing & Coalition Building Updates

People's Platform
On September 7, members of ONE DC's Shared Leadership team held a report-back with several members about decisions made during the annual Shared Leadership retreat about the future of the People's Platform. The People's Platform is a visionary framework that guides ONE DC's work, whether it be through our Right to Housing campaigns, the Black Workers Center, Cooperation DC, our resource organizing, or any other work. We seek to accomplish our goals by centering the leadership of working class black women; being funded by our base; prioritizing political education and leadership development in our work; always seeking to build a deeper analysis and assessing our work; building alternative institutions; learning from past movement's successes and limitations; championing non-reformist reforms; and always seeking to be a part of a broader movement that is multi-national, multi-ethnic, multi-gender, and multi-class.

A full-time community organizer is expected to join ONE DC this fall. Monthly People's Platform General Body meetings will be held to serve as unifying political education & leader development spaces for ONE DC members across all campaigns & committees. We also seek to build up the membership of our Organizing & Member Development Committee, which will ensure our organizing, coalition building, community learning, & member development efforts are all member-led, strategic, & done interdependently.
Click here to read more about the People's Platform

Black Workers Center
Members from the Black Workers Center and Cooperation DC sat down with DMPED's Sharon Carney on September 15th to share information about the worker cooperative landscape in DC. The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development (DMPED) is beginning to develop a new economic strategy and is interested in cooperative development as part of a broader economic strategy for DC. To get involved with Cooperation DC, click here.

ONE DC Black Workers Center staff also attended a presentation by the Workforce Investment Council's Executive Director Odie Donald on September 15th. The Workforce Investment Council is "responsible for advising the Mayor, Council, and the District government on the development, implementation, and continuous improvement of an integrated and effective workforce investment system." We attended to learn more the state of workforce development in DC. ONE DC Black Workers Center members demand a shift from failed training models that don't result in actual employment, to paid, on-the-job apprenticeships.

Click here to RSVP for next monthly Black Workers Center Meeting October 20th


Upcoming Events

Admin & Organizational Management Committee Meeting
Tuesday, September 27 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following: website, member database, social media, enewsletter & communication, strategic planning, member events & more.
Click here to RSVP

All Out for Barry Farm! Rally & Hearing to Protect Public Housing
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Empower DC needs everyone who can to turn out in support of Barry Farm public housing residents. They are fighting to remain in their homes in the midst of the City’s effort to privatize the property and relocate them. The Zoning Comission has already approved the demolition, however the Barry Farm Tenants and Allies Association is appealing the decision in court. Join us to send the message that dislocation IS hardship, and the DC Housing Authority is violating the law by not protecting the needs of residents.
Click here for more info & to RSVP

Black Women Activists Needed Ages 18-50 for Focus Groups
Wednesday, September 28 - 5:30 PM
Howard University, 239 Fredrick Douglass Building
The purpose of this study is to evaluate the strategies and practices of Black women ages 18-50 years old participating in movements against police brutality and killings. These interviews will help us to better understand the attitudes of Black women activists. Additionally, factors that contribute to, or mitigate the effects of police brutality and killings on Black women activists will be explored. Assessing activists' perceptions of and experience with dealing with police violence will provide a more comprehensive picture of activists' strategies for future research and practice implications for social movements.
Refreshments provided & chance to win a gift card! Contact Shaneda Destine at shaneda.destine@bison.howard.edu (IRB Case 16-CAS-35)

Investing in the Ecosystem of Social Change
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Thursday September 29 - 6:00 PM
Impact Hub DC - 419 7th Street NW, 3rd Floor
A salon-style discussion focusing on the following questions: What are the models and initiatives that brings us closer to a more just, vibrant, and equitable human experience? How are these models creating impact? How can we support these models?
Click here for more info & to RSVP

From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation - Author Talk with Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor
Monday, October 3 - 7:00 pm
The Potter's House - 1658 Columbia Rd NW
The eruption of mass protests in the wake of the police murders of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in New York City have challenged the impunity with which officers of the law carry out violence against Black people and punctured the illusion of a postracial America. The Black Lives Matter movement has awakened a new generation of activists. In this stirring and insightful analysis, activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation.
Click here for more info & to RSVP

ONE DC Bit of Good News

ONE DC is excited to announce that our Resource Organizer Dominic Moulden, in partnership with Dr. Mindi Fullilove and Derek Hyra, have been selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Interdisciplinary Research Leader Fellow. Interdisciplinary Research Leaders will bring together researchers and on-the-ground change agents, and equip them with advanced leadership skills and a clear focus on health and equity. Together they will break down silos, address health disparities and build fundamentally healthier communities. They will build bridges between the myriad factors that have such an enormous influence on people’s health—education, neighborhoods, transportation, income, faith, and so on. They will transform our culture at every level, putting health and equity at the core.
Click here to read more



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - August 2016

"We must shake our conscience free of the rapacious capitalism, racism and patriarchy that will only ensure our own self-destruction." -Berta Caceres

Brookland Manor Families & ONE DC File Lawsuit Against Mid-City; Residents Organize Against Displacement, Harassment, & Intimidation

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Brookland Manor resident Cheryl Brunson speaks at the press conference on August 25, 2016

As you have heard, the proposed redevelopment of Brookland Manor will eliminate and reduce family-sized housing for nearly 150 families. This redevelopment will eliminate significant affordable family sized housing in the Brentwood neighborhood and force ONE DC members and residents to move from the community in which they have long resided and which they call home. The exclusion of these families from Brookland Manor destroys their community and will disrupt their children’s education and the networks of services and supports that many residents rely on. Medical doctor Mindy Fullilove calls this health condition “root shock”—a phenomena which tears up primarily Black working class communities. ONE DC’s organizing is designed to resist these conditions, and our legal team supports us in these efforts.

The developers wrote to the tenants that large families must be excluded from the redeveloped property because large families are “not consistent with the creation of a vibrant new community.” They justified the negative impact that the elimination of large units would have on families by telling the Zoning Commission that “housing very large families in apartment complexes is significantly impactful upon the quality of life of households as well as their surrounding neighbors.” These statements reflect a hostility towards families that violates both federal and District of Columbia Fair Housing laws, which prohibit discrimination based on one’s familial status. ONE DC supports our legal team through our organizing to make “the developers obey the law.” If the residents and ONE DC members don’t make the developers obey the Fair Housing laws, they will violate them. We join the families of Brookland Manor who are bringing this lawsuit in demanding that the developer obey the Fair Housing laws!

Our members and our legal team support the choice of Brookland Manor residents to have a large family or a small one, to live with multiple generations or to live alone which is protected by law. Click here to read Dominic Moulden's full remarks from the press conference.

Media Coverage of Brookland Manor

The Mysterious Private Police Force That’s Killing People In The Nation’s Capital Carimah Townes, Think Progress, August 31

DC Residents File Housing Lawsuit Against Developer Mark Segraves, NBC4 Washington, August 26

D.C. Developers Accused of Pushing Out Poor, Britain Eakin, Courthouse News Service, August 26

Brookland Residents Sue Owner Of Massive Complex Over Redevelopment Plans, Rachel Sadon, DCist, August 25

Northeast Tenants Sue Owner for Alleged Discrimination, Andrew Giambrone, Washington City Paper, August 25

As the nation’s capital booms, poor tenants face eviction over as little as $25 Terrence McCoy, Washington Post, August 8


A Reflection on Black August & Organizing with ONE DC

By Paige DeLoach, ONE DC Intern, Cornell University

During the last week of my summer internship with ONE DC, I received an email from Dominic Moulden advertising Black August, a BYP100 and BLM-DC month long event. Black August is described as “a month of rest from, reflection on, and recommitment to our decades long struggle.” Rest from the struggle, reflection on the struggle, recommitment to the struggle. An August that is Black like me. A struggle that is mine.

IMG_6863.JPGBlack August is so necessary. So often, people fighting the essential fights do not recognize their work as continued exposure to trauma. Black people face constant assaults on our personhood and our integrity. We fight for the right to inhabit our bodies, to be in charge of them, to protect and treasure them. This specific kind of fight, against racism and mistreatment, requires us to confront triggering experiences, possibly even share and re­live them, so that others see the validity of this plight. But when we must use these experiences as fuel, we are denied the chance to heal.

Black people are familiar with burnout. Black people are familiar with wounds that are cut open every day. Burnout is full of rage, hopelessness, weariness ­ a type of emptiness that is very hard to shake. Through my internship, I hoped to fight for and with those too burnt out to fight alone. I wanted to take part in fighting for the rights of Black people in my community. I wanted to build power, to provide support, to give solidarity. I wanted to give people the chance to heal.

My work at ONE DC taught me how to work for and with others, how to be an active citizen in the creation of public policy, and how a non­profit organization can help create positive and sustainable change from within a community. I met Angela Davis and Barbara Ransby; I was part of a DC artist’s inner circle for a night; I yelled at city officials; I protested.

As I look back to where I was and all ONE DC accomplished this summer, the one fact I know is that ONE DC gave me the chance to heal, because I was in need of the solidarity I was trying to provide. My rest from the struggle involved joining the struggle of others, and realizing that as I fight for others I fight for myself. We fight for one another to assure ourselves we are not helpless or hopeless, but that within us lies the power to change our world. Spaces like ONE DC and Black
August are essential to our survival, because when we come together, we lift one another up ­ we save each other.

As I return to school, I know that transitioning back to a primarily white institution will be difficult, but I am not afraid. More than anything, I am grateful to every person I met through ONE DC this summer, who helped me heal: you have made all the difference. More than anything, I am eager to come from this period of rest and reflection recommited to the struggle. More than anything, I am ready.
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“Who made us forget our past? Who can make us forget that we come from a long legacy of organizers, thinkers, and doers who understood that the fight can be long, it can be hard, but it can be won?”


Watch Video from ONE DC 10th Anniversary Juneteenth Celebration

Thank you to ONE DC member Paul Abowd for filming our 10th Anniversary Juneteenth Celebration! Click here to watch & share video of the event, including the community dialogue with Dr. Angela Davis & Dr. Barbara Ransby.

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And don't forget to make your 10th Anniversary donation to ONE DC!

 


Black Workers Continue Building Community Power in DC

Artist Edgar Reyes works with members to complete mural for new Black Workers Center space

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Join Jobs with Justice in #BlackWorkMatters Twitter Town Hall September 1st, 2:00 - 3:00 PM

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Share your story, experience, and thoughts on #BlackWorkMatters tomorrow from 2-3 PM and throughout Labor Day weekend.

  • What would our country look like if Black lives mattered in our employment and economic systems?
  • What are the biggest opportunities right now for Black communities to organize and win economic justice fights?
  • What propels and inspires you to continue working at the intersection of economic and racial justice?
  • What strategies and initiatives do you see as leading the way in dismantling the ways racism shapes our economy?
Info Session at Skyland Workforce Center

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Join Mind.Over.Matter Collective in Solidarity Demonstration to Support Incarcerated Strikers

 

Currently, incarcerated people in over 20 states, have organized to not give their labor to the prisons on Friday, Sept 9th. The United States is the most incarcerated nation in the world. Due to this, most people, whether they have served time in prisons or not, have been affected by them - family members, friends, friend's family members. This is an extremely dangerous action for them to take. So we, 'the people' on the other side of the wall have to show up and hold them through their struggles. Mind.Over.Matter, along with ally organizations, plan to hold a noise demo at the prison to support the prisoners' direct action.

Due to the nature of this action (protesting on prison grounds), this is considered a potentially arrestable action. Mind.Over.Matter collective will hold a meeting/training this Sunday September 4th 12pm-3pm at 1624 Division St. 21217 Baltimore, MD. There will be transportation for willing participants.

Click here for more info and to RSVP

For additional questions and info, email powerfularetheproactive@gmail.com

 


Upcoming Events

Black Workers Center Meeting
Thursday, September 15 - 6:00 PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
To challenge chronic black unemployment and underemployment, we must understand how race & work intersect while creating spaces where Black workers can create their own opportunities for training, employment, and worker ownership.
Click here to RSVP

ONE DC Admin & Organizational Management Committee

Tuesday, September 27 - 6:00 PM
ONE DC Office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
Admin Committee meets monthly to identify what tasks need to be completed that month, assign tasks to members, & discuss long-term committee strategy. Committee oversees some of the following:

  • Writing regular blog posts or taking photos for the website
  • Website design & maintenance
  • Social media strategy
  • Monthly enewsletter & email blasts
  • Maintaining member & donor database
  • Reorganizing & archiving ONE DC documents to preserve our community learning & organizing history
  • Strategic Planning

Click here to RSVP


ONE DC Bit of Good News -  Upcoming Walking Tour Part of "What's Going On: Voices of Shaw"

Shaw Community Social Justice Walking Tour

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Thursday, September 29 - 6:00 PM
Meet at ONE DC office - 614 S St NW, Carriage House
ONE DC invites you to engage with us in a conversation and community learning process about displacement and resistance in DC, and how we organize for equitable development. ONE DC will show you the physical side of gentrification in the Shaw neighborhood and discuss its effects on the community, along with stories of how ONE DC organizes with residents to stand up for community-led, equitable development. Participants will have the opportunity to raise and discuss questions together, as well as tie learned experience to the Shaw story and context. We will explore the interconnectedness of the right to housing, the right to income, and the right to wellness. Participants will walk a little less than 1 mile total. Depending on questions and reflections, tour lasts about 75-90 minutes.We are presenting this tour free to residents as part of "What’s Going On: Voices of Shaw," a public art project that examines and celebrates the micro-cultures of Shaw through the voices and diverse lens of the community. For more info or to submit your own project, click here. We welcome donations to support the organizing work of ONE DC.

Space is limited. Click here to RSVP.



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ONE DC Monthly Voice - July 2016

 

The Monthly Voice

July 2016 - ONE DC Newsletter

 


"I've never been involved in all that activist stuff, but now I'm dedicated to the cause wherever there's injustice." -Mr. Green, VP of tenant association at Congress Heights, speaking at a rally in front of his slumlord's house


March Against Slumlords and WIN for Affordable Housing in Congress Heights

By Clara Lincoln

Saturday, July 23 at 11am with the temperature pushing 100 degrees, over 40 people gathered around the Cleveland Park metro station to demand an end to the slumlord control of a Congress Heights property.

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March Against Slumlords protest


Read more about the situation from Justice First here.

The protest began as people gathered at the Cleveland Park metro station, crowding into the shade of trees. Eugene Puryear of Justice First and Stop Police Terror Project DC took the mic and riled up the crowd, many of whom held signs about gentrification and slumlords. At least 5 people in the crowd were tenants either from Congress Heights or other buildings organizing to exercise their Tenant Opportunity to Purchase Act (TOPA) rights in order to buy their building.

After Eugene's explanation of where we were going and why, we started our uphill, sticky march to Geoff Griffis' house. Griffis is the developer who partnered with Sanford Capital, a slumlord responsible for letting building conditions deteriorate to the point that there are roaches & rats, flooded basements, and trash sitting for months waiting to be picked up. Justice First retrieved the address through online research on Griffis' donations to Mayor Bowser's 2014 mayoral campaign -- a strategic move on Griffis' part. Griffis is also involved in the wharf development, which received $95 million worth of waterfront property from the city for only $1.00.

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Conditions at Congress Heights building

Griffis and Sanford Capital are letting the building deteriorate to try to force the tenants to move out before they can exercise their right to buy the building. But the tenants will not back down. When we arrived at Griffis' house, three tenants from Congress Heights took the mic to talk about their experiences. They expressed how inspired they were that so many people showed up on such a hot day. One said, "We've been fighting for three years. But what we want Griffis to know is you've got rid of some, but you're not getting rid of us," referring to people who have chosen to move away and stop fighting. The President and VP of the tenant association both gave inspiring speeches as people cheered and clapped. We assumed the house was empty since we saw no signs of life, but their words were as much for the crowd as for Griffis' neighbors.

After about 20 minutes of chants and testimonies, the slumlord appeared. As Schyla Pondexter-Moore from Empower DC held the mic, Griffis stepped out of his house with a box of cold water bottles. Schyla, the tenants and the crowd all turned around, rushed to the fence, and booed. Schyla said into the mic that he was no better than a slave master for the way he's treated the tenants. One tenant yelled, "We don't want your water, we want a change of heart!" Griffis opened the gate, set the box on the ground, closed the gate, gave a curt wave, and walked back inside. Check out our twitter feed to see a video of the end of the encounter. Needless to say, no one drank the water. We had brought enough of our own.

We marched and chanted back down the hill towards Connecticut Avenue. We were so fired up that we walked straight into the intersection and blocked Connecticut Avenue for a few minutes, telling passersby who Griffis was and why we were marching. Police redirected traffic even though we had no permit to block the intersection-- a testament, in my opinion, to DC police's strategy of causing as little noise as possible during protests to keep media quiet.

The protest displayed layers of solidarity. Community members and organizers came out to support the Congress Heights tenants. Luchadorxs in other buildings trying to exercise their TOPA rights showed up for a similar fight across the river. Many individuals and organizations brought water and ice to pass out. And Griffis' neighbors even stopped to listen to what we had to say. It revitalized and inspired the tenants and organizers, educated a crowd and some Cleveland Park neighbors, and left people with a follow-up action step.

Griffis and Sanford Capital want access to even more land near the Congress Heights metro station on which to build luxury apartments. As soon as Justice First found out that the WMATA board was planning to vote Thursday (today!) on whether or not to give even more land to Sanford Capital, they did what they do best-- they organized. At the march this past Saturday, they handed out information sheets like the one below urging the crowds to contact Councilmember Jack Evans, urging him to table the vote. They spread the call to action on social media as well.

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Then, Thursday morning, they learned they had won. Many ONE DC members who had emailed Evans got responses informing them of WMATA's decision. Here is the text from an email Evans sent to a ONE DC intern:

"Thank you very much for taking the time to share your thoughts on this important issue.  Upon further review of the Congress Heights sale agreement item, I agree that postponing the vote is the most prudent option at this time.  I am happy to report that the WMATA Board also agree and the item has been tabled until a later meeting."

Justice First, Congress Heights tenants, and all those who contacted Evans made this happen. Thank you to our members who called, emailed, & tweeted. This is a WIN that proves the power of collective organizing and solidarity.

But the fight isn't over. The vote will come before the board again. And the Congress Heights tenants are still living in slum conditions. Stay involved in the fight for equitable housing by following Justice First on Facebook.  #DefendAffordableHousing #SaveCongressHeights

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Black August DC 2016 - A Note from BYP100, Black Lives Matter DC, Movement for Black Lives

DC has a long and well-known history of observing Black August through the exemplary leadership and hard work of the Black August Planning Organization (BAPO).

This August, Black Youth Project 100 (BYP 100) DC and Black Lives Matter-DC (BLM DC), as part of the DC Movement 4 Black Lives Steering Committee (M4BL), are calling for a month-long observance and celebration of Black August as a month of rest from, reflection on, and recommitment to our decades long struggle. It is a call to intensify community education on ending mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex, securing freedom of all political prisoners, resisting police brutality and murder, and re-defining safety beyond policing in Black communities.

The History of Black August

Our comrades in the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement share, “Black August originated in the concentration camps (prisons) of California to honor fallen Freedom Fighters, Jonathan Jackson, George Jackson, William Christmas, James McClain and Khatari Gaulden. Jonathan Jackson was gunned down outside the Marin County California courthouse on August 7, 1970 as he attempted to liberate three imprisoned Black Liberation Fighters: James McClain, William Christmas and Ruchell Magee.”

“Black August is a time to study and practice education and outreach about our history and the current conditions of our people.” Additionally, “As the Black August practice and tradition spread, it grew to observe not only the sacrifices of the brothers in California’s concentration camps, but the sacrifices and struggles of our ancestors against white supremacy.”

Black August Events

Volunteer Meeting & Community Outreach Day
The first Volunteer Meeting for Black August will be held in the Large Meeting Room. It is really important to attend the volunteer meeting in person, but if it is absolutely not feasible but you want to volunteer please email April at keepdc4me@gmail.com as soon as possible. The Community Outreach Day will be this Saturday from 12PM to 4PM. Details will be discussed at the meeting.
TONIGHT, Thursday, July
28- 7PM to 8:30PM
Benning (Dorothy I. Height) Neighborhood Library Large Meeting Room - 3935 Benning Rd NE
Click here to RSVP


DC Night Out for Safety and Liberation
Join BYP100 DC, BLM DC, and the Movement 4 Black Lives DC for a conversation on what true public safety looks like in our city. Vendors, performances, food, story-telling, music, and fun for all ages - Night Out for Safety and Liberation is a space for our community to imagine ideas of safety that are not rooted in policing and incarceration - with specific focus on solutions beyond mythic "community-policing". Instead, join us in uplifting a narrative that speaks to investing the appropriate resources and policies needed within our communities to help support and #BuildBlackFutures. To us, #SafetyIs access to healthcare, employment, safe and dignified housing, childcare, and more. What does safety look like to you?
Tuesday, August 2 - 5:30PM to 9:30PM
The Perch- 3400 Georgia Ave NW

Click here to RSVP


Protest and Shut Down at DC Jail
Cease Fire: Don’t Smoke the Brothers and Sisters are leading a protest at DC Jail. This is a response to the death of “LT” Leslie Irby at DC Jail on July 14, 2016 as a result of the dangerously high temperatures in the jail. Cease Fire and the community have put tremendous pressure on authorities for justice with some success but now they need the whole city behind them to get justice for this death, a full investigation of the jail and its Director, the horrible conditions inside the jail, and the inhumane treatment of those inside. They also demand the immediate termination of the Director.
Wednesday, Aug
ust 3 - 1PM
DC Jail - 1901 D St SE

If you want to hold your own event as part of Black August, please send an email to wellexaminedlife@gmail.com as soon as possible. Please feel free share widely and text “KeepDC” to 91990 for updates, alerts, and actions.
Stay updated on all Black August events here!


Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift

Join the ONE DC Black Workers Center ApprenticeShift Campaign!!

For the last several months we've come together at ONE DC's Black Workers Center to create a transformative organizing campaign aimed at creating jobs and shifting the way workforce development is done in the city. For too long the District government has invested millions in jobs training programs that don't create jobs. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the Black unemployment rate in DC is 13.6% - the highest in the country.

History has taught us that the only way to change these dire statistics is to organize. In 2014, ONE DC members organized and successfully got 178 workers hired at the Marriott Marquis Hotel on Massachusetts Avenue NW. We did it before and we can do it again. Join us for our next meeting Thursday, August 19 to learn how to get involved with the ApprenticeShift campaign. We demand that the city shift from a failed jobs training model and expand opportunities for paid apprenticeships (on the job training). We'll discuss the campaign plan and timeline, outreach, and specific ways you can get involved.

Thursday, August 18 - 6PM
United Black Fund - 2500 MLK Jr Ave SE
Click here to RSVP


The Mousai House: A Cooperative Vision for a New Creative Economy

Check out this excerpt from a new piece about cooperative music production in Brookland, DC by local organizer and radio host Jennifer Bryant:

"The Tuesday music lessons turned into all night jam sessions, attracting the cream of the crop of local hip hop, soul, and jazz musicians. Maimouna Youssef, Tamika Love Jones, and the CooLots were there. It was an informal network of peer-to-peer knowledge sharing that operated outside of the confines of the traditional economy. 'While we were in those early stages it was a value exchange rather than a monetary exchange,' Jones shared. 'And people found value in having a creative space in which to collaborate with other artists.” This reinforces Dr. Nembhard’s belief that the next economy must move beyond the price system. 'Of particular importance,' she explains, 'is the fact that resources are not solely financial. It’s not just about market relationships.' From the beginning, this has been a core value in the Mousai House culture."

Read the full piece here!


SoulFiesta! Celebrate a Decade of Cooperative Organizing with 1417 N St Cooperative!

The 1417 N St. Cooperative (Norwood) and the City First Family invite you to honor the culmination of a decade of community organizing and progress toward creating a 83-unit limited equity cooperative. We are celebrating the renovation of our building with a community block party!

Date: Sat, July 30, 2016
Time: 4:00-7:00pm (Ribbon cutting ceremony @ 5PM)
Where: 1417 N St. NW Washington, D.C. (between Vermont Ave & 14th St. NW)

Please join us and be a part of the SoulFiesta community celebration. We will share music, art, and tamales!

Click here to RSVP


Free Books for Kids from DC Library

Register your child to receive a FREE book every month. All DC kids from birth to 5 years old can now receive free books in the mail once a month. Kids who are signed up when they are born will receive 60 free books by the time they turn 5. To sign up for this completely free program, you must register at dclibrary.org/booksfrombirth.


 

ONE DC Featured in Consumer Health Foundation Annual Report 2015 Release

 

"We have a shared responsibility to create a region in which everyone has an equal opportunity to live a healthy and dignified life. Differences in health and life expectancy between whites and people of color — which contribute to thousands of people being ill or dying in our region each year — can be avoided. Our communities can become places of opportunity through equitable public policies that enable people to get the health care they need, earn income, and generate wealth to support themselves, their families and their communities. We look forward to working across sectors in the coming months and years to achieve this vision. this decision in order to balance our intentionally high spend rate during the years following the 2008 recession (2009-2013), an uncertain and financially challenging times for our grantee partners. Now we are in a new time marked by social upheaval, and while we will continue to carefully steward the foundation’s resources, we will also take advantage of every opportunity to deepen our work on racial equity."

Read the full report here

 


Upcoming Events

DC Fund in the Sun!
Saturday, July 30 - Hosted by Brigette Rouson
Two ways to support the grassroots social justice fund for changemakers of color in the nation's capital. All proceeds go to support the Diverse City Fund.
12PM - Purse Swap at Serendipity Jazz Coffeehouse - co-host Lizette Rouson-Benefield - live music and light brunch
7 PM - Dance party at Emergence Community Arts Collective - co-host Sylvia Robinson - DJ and light snacks

Job Fair- Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
Thursday, August 11 - 10AM to 3PM
Convention Center - 801 Mt Vernon Pl NW
Click here to RSVP


ONE Bit of Good News - Black Workers Center Members Work with Muralist Edgar Reyes on Art Project

Tonight, members of the Black Workers Center will be meeting with muralist Edgar Reyes to continue discussing the design for a mural in the space. This mural will reflect the powerful intersections of organizing and art, of culture and activism. The members will guide the design process until the mural embodies the ideas and beauty in the organizing coming out of that space.

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This image is a draft of Edgar's current design for the mural. The people would likely change, as well as the whole design-- depending on what the community thinks tonight in the meeting!


 

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